Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Sport https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ A could lose Trevor Rosenthal for months, Matt Olson is day after day, and John Fisher’s team is unprepared – The Athletic

A could lose Trevor Rosenthal for months, Matt Olson is day after day, and John Fisher’s team is unprepared – The Athletic



It was 1983, and Don Fisher knew something was wrong. His business – Gap Inc. – recently topped the sales and profit records, publishing the highest figures in the company’s 14-year history. In theory, Fisher should be happy, but when he walked into his stores, he saw chaos. Inscriptions with yellow labels were strewn everywhere; advertising methods seemed cheap, with more emphasis on discounts than quality.

Fisher wanted to run an elegant business at full prices, not some lucrative basket that was successful because of its low prices, and he saw long-term writing on the wall. This was not a sustainable way to run a company. It was profitable, but something was missing.

“Making money is one thing,”

; he says in his memoir, “Falling Into the Gap,” “but you should be proud of what you do. At the moment I had a lot of disappointments and not much pride.




Source link