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A man flying a Jetpack spotted near LAX for the second time: NPR



Planes are not the only things flying over Los Angeles International Airport these days. A man wearing a jet pack has been spotted flying amicably across the sky twice in two months.

Mario Tama / Getty images


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Mario Tama / Getty images

Planes are not the only things flying over Los Angeles International Airport these days. A man wearing a jet pack has been spotted flying in the friendly sky twice in two months.

Mario Tama / Getty images

A man has been spotted soaring high over Southern California with a jetpack.

Again.

On Wednesday, for the second time in six weeks, an unidentified person was spotted flying with a backpack near Los Angeles International Airport. It is unclear whether this is the same individual who was recently spotted carrying a jet near the same airport.

This time, the backpack flew at 6,000 feet in the air.

China Airlines crew members reported the surveillance on Wednesday afternoon about 7 miles northwest of the airport, the Federal Aviation Administration told NPR.

The Federal Aviation Administration said it had “warned local law enforcement and would consider the report.” The FBI is also investigating “multiple reports” of witnesses, FBI spokeswoman Laura Emiler told NPR.

No one is allowed to fly in the airspace near airports without permission from air traffic control, an FAA spokesman told NPR. This includes these sports jets.

On August 30, two airline pilots reported a man flying with a jet pack about 3,000 feet near LAX, according to the FAA.

“We just passed a man in a backpack,” a pilot told an air traffic controller on August 30th.

The controller continued to inform another pilot and I couldn’t help but comment on the strangeness of the situation:

“Only in Los Angeles.”

Reese Oxner is an intern at the NPR news office.


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