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Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Science https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ A massive asteroid collision once caused the Earth to cool down and enter an ice age. Can we repeat it?

A massive asteroid collision once caused the Earth to cool down and enter an ice age. Can we repeat it?




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The evolution of life on Earth is sometimes dependent on astronomical events. We know this from the case of dinosaurs that have been destroyed A 1

0-kilometer asteroid or comet struck The Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico about 66 million years ago.

However, scientists have only now discovered that a major ice age many millions of years ago was caused by a collision of asteroids in the solar system.

Can this unexpected finding help to address global warming? L-chondritis par ent body ”, published in Science Advances, by researchers at Field Field in Chicago, Lund University in Sweden and others, claim that the collapse of a major asteroid 466 million years ago filled the entire internal solar system with og Roma dust quantities leading to the Ice Age. & nbsp;

How big was the asteroid?

The calculations put the asteroid in question about 93 miles wide. However, instead of hitting Earth, this asteroid simply split into the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and created much more dust than usual in the internal solar system. This is the largest documented disintegration in the last three billion years, and its disintegration still accounts for nearly a third of all meteorites that have fallen on Earth today, according to the document.

What is cosmic dust?

Earth always has cosmic dust in its atmosphere, as well as dust from volcanoes, deserts and sea salt. In the current stratosphere, extraterrestrial dust represents 1% of all dust and is not of climatic importance. "Typically, the Earth accumulates about 40,000 tons of alien material each year," says Philip Heck, a curator at the Field Museum, an associate professor at the University of Chicago and one of the paper's authors. "Our hypothesis is that large amounts of alien dust over a period of at least two million years have played an important role in changing Earth's climate, contributing to cooling," says Heck.

How does cosmic dust cool the Earth's climate? & Nbsp [19659005] Essentially, by blocking the light of the Sun, it is already known that the Earth's climate cooled 466 million years ago, but how exactly the "Ordovician Ice Houses" were triggered or intensified so far is a mystery. the dust partially stopped the sun "It is analogous to standing in the middle of your living room and smashing a vacuum cleaner bag on a much larger scale," says Birger Schmitz, professor of geology at the University of Lund. "Our results show for the first time that such dust has sometimes cooled the Earth dramatically."

How cosmic dust increases Earth's biodiversity & nbsp;

The arrival of all the cosmic dust has happened so gradually – in fact, for at least two million years – life has been able to adapt to changing temperatures, leading to the explosion of new species. This is called " The Great Ordovician Biodiversity Event ".

How could it help to combat global warming? & Nbsp;

"We're talking about millions of years in time," Heck says. "This is very different from the climate change caused by the meteorite 65 million years ago that killed dinosaurs, and is different from global warming today – this global cooling was a slight push." ​​& Nbsp;

However, the unexpected discovery may be important in dealing with global warming if carbon dioxide emissions are not reduced. Can we reproduce the dusty shower that caused global cooling 466 million years ago? It is possible to place asteroids in orbits around the Earth in such a way that they continually shed dust and partially block sunlight from reaching Earth. Heck believes such a scheme would be very risky. "Geoengineering proposals need to be evaluated very critically and very carefully, because if things go awry, things can get worse than before," he says. However, this knowledge can be useful. "We are experiencing global warming, this is indisputable, and we need to think about how to prevent catastrophic effects or minimize them," he says. "Any idea that is reasonable must be explored."

"Our results show for the first time that such dust has cooled the Earth dramatically," Schmitz says. "Our research can provide a more detailed, empirically grounded understanding of how this works, and this in turn can be used to evaluate whether model simulations are realistic. "& nbsp;

I wish you clear skies and wide eyes.

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The evolution of life on Earth is sometimes dependent on astronomical events. We know this from the case of dinosaurs that were wiped out by a 10 km asteroid or comet that struck the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico about 66 million years ago.

However, scientists have just discovered that a major ice age many millions of years ago was caused by an asteroid collision in the solar system.

Can this unexpected finding help to cope with global warming?

In an article entitled "Extraterrestrial Trigger for the Middle Ages Ice Age: Dust from the Disintegration of the Body of L-Chondro Parents," published in Science Advances, researchers at Field Field in Chicago, Lund University in Sweden, and others, that the collapse of a major asteroid 466 million years ago filled the entire inner solar system with huge amounts of dust leading to the Ice Age.

How big was the asteroid?

The calculations put the asteroid in question at about 93 miles. However, instead of hitting the Earth, this asteroid just collapsed in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and created much more dust than usual in the inner solar system. This is the largest documented disintegration in the last three billion years, and its disintegration still accounts for nearly a third of all meteorites that have fallen on Earth today, according to the document.

What is cosmic dust?

Earth always has cosmic dust in its atmosphere, as well as dust from volcanoes, deserts and sea salt. In the current stratosphere, extraterrestrial dust represents 1% of all dust and is not of climatic importance. "Typically, the Earth accumulates about 40,000 tons of alien material each year," says Philip Heck, a curator at the Field Museum, an associate professor at the University of Chicago and one of the paper's authors. "Our hypothesis is that large quantities of extraterrestrial dust over at least two million years have played an important role in changing Earth's climate, contributing to cooling," says Heck.

How does cosmic dust cool the Earth's climate?

Essentially, by blocking the light of the Sun, it was already known that the Earth's climate cooled 466 million years ago, but how exactly the "conditions of the Ordovician ice houses" triggered or intensified is a mystery so far. the dust effect partially stopped by the sunlight reaching the Earth and the ice age began. "It's analogous to standing in the middle of your living room and smashing your vacuum cleaner bag on a much larger scale," says Birger Schmidt, a professor of geology at the University of Geology "Our results show for the first time that such dust has sometimes cooled the Earth dramatically."

As cosmic dust increased the Earth's biodiversity

The arrival of all this cosmic dust happened so gradually – in action tvitelnost for at least two million years – life has been able to adapt to changing temperatures, leading to an explosion of new species. This is called the "Great Ordovician Biodiversity Event".

How Researchers Estimate It

They searched for traces of cosmic dust in 466 million annual rocks and compared it to small micrometeorites from Antarctica. "We studied extraterrestrial matter, meteorites and micrometeorites in sedimentary records of the Earth, which means rocks that were once a seabed," Heck says of the study of fossil sediment on the seabed in Kinekulle in southern Sweden. "And then we took out the alien matter to find out what it was and where it came from." Extraction of extraterrestrial matter was a difficult process, since the ancient rocks had to be treated with acid to eat the stone and allow the "cosmic things" to be chemically analyzed. They found that helium atoms lacked neutrons – a sure sign of launching from the sun – as well as the rare metals commonly found in asteroids.

In short, asteroid dust is enriched in helium after being bombarded by the solar wind on its way to Earth. "This result was completely unexpected," Schmitz says. "It was only when we received the last measurements of helium that everything came into place."

How can it help to combat global warming?

"We're talking about millions of years in time," Heck says. "This is very different from the climate change caused by the meteorite 65 million years ago that killed dinosaurs and is different from global warming today – this global cooling was a slight push." ​​

However, the unexpected discovery may be appropriate. to tackle global warming if carbon dioxide emissions are not reduced. Can we reproduce the dusty shower that caused global cooling 466 million years ago? It is possible to place asteroids in orbits around the Earth in such a way that they continually shed dust and partially block sunlight from reaching Earth. Heck believes such a scheme would be very risky. "Geoengineering proposals need to be evaluated very critically and very carefully, because if things go awry, things can get worse than before," he says. However, this knowledge can be useful. "We are experiencing global warming, this is indisputable, and we need to think about how to prevent catastrophic effects or minimize them," he says. "Any idea that is reasonable must be explored."

"Our results show for the first time that such dust has cooled the Earth dramatically," Schmitz says. "Our studies can provide a more detailed, empirically based understanding of how it works, and this in turn can be used to evaluate whether model simulations are realistic." .


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