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A restaurant in Kentucky disobeys the governor’s order and continues to eat indoors



When bars and restaurants in Kentucky closed indoors on Friday night, at least one restaurant owner refused. Despite the governor’s order requiring bars and restaurants to suspend indoor service until 5pm on Friday, Beans Cafe and Bakery in Dry Ridge decided not to comply with the directive. Families were still eating at the restaurant after the five-hour break. Owner Richard Haihow posted a letter on Facebook announcing the relocation of customers. More than a thousand comments revealed mixed, passionate opinions. “For 99.6% survival, we are destroying the economy and destroying people’s lives and all the things that go with it,”

; Heihou said. Just two months ago, a Kentucky attorney general filed a lawsuit challenging the governor’s pandemic orders, such as mandates for masks and business restrictions. “We were part of that process, we represented the restaurant industry in that process,” Heihou said. to the governor, however, saying that Beshear had acted on his own. Beans, meanwhile, agree with Hayhoe: He has to decide whether to eat at a restaurant or not. “They certainly wanted to support the Hayhoe family, which owns the bean business, stay open during the alleged shutdown,” said client Paul Trelk. “You know the idea is to stop the coronavirus or spread it by stopping the business, and I think that’s a ridiculous idea.” WLWT turned to Grant County Sheriff’s Office and the Dry Ridge Police Department to see if they would pass. and will carry out the governor’s order. We have not received a response.

When bars and restaurants in Kentucky closed indoors on Friday night, at least one restaurant owner refused.

Despite the governor’s order that bars and restaurants must suspend indoor service until 5:00 pm on Friday, the Beans Café and Dry Ridge Bakery decided not to comply with the directive.

Families were still eating at the restaurant after the five-hour break.

Owner Richard Haihow posted a letter on Facebook announcing the relocation of customers. More than a thousand comments revealed mixed, passionate opinions.

“For 99.6% survival, we are destroying the economy and destroying people’s lives and all that goes with it,” Heihou said.

Just two months ago, the Kentucky Attorney General filed a lawsuit challenging the governor’s pandemic orders, such as mandates for masks and business restrictions.

“We were part of this lawsuit, we represented the restaurant business in this lawsuit,” Heiho said.

However, the state’s Supreme Court ruled in favor of the governor, saying Beshir had acted on his own.

Meanwhile, Beans customers agree with Hayhoe: They have to decide whether to eat at a restaurant or not.

“I certainly wanted to support the Heiho family, which owns the bean business, to stay open during the alleged shutdown,” said client Paul Trelk. “You know the idea is that by stopping the business, we’re going to stop the coronavirus or its spread, and I think that’s a ridiculous idea.”

The WLWT contacted Grant County Sheriff’s Office and the Dry Ridge Police Department to see if they would come and carry out the governor’s order. We have not received a response.


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