Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Health https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ A student in the Faet County school district diagnosed with whooping cough

A student in the Faet County school district diagnosed with whooping cough



A student in the Fayet County school district diagnosed with whooping cough

Coughing with donkeys is a highly contagious disease that spreads in the air when an infected person sneezes or coughs


A first-grader in a school district in Fayet County was diagnosed with whooping cough. Frazier school officials sent a letter home to parents warning them that their child may have been in close contact with the student. The Pennsylvania Department of Health has notified the school that the first-grader has been diagnosed with the highly contagious disease. A noisy cough spreads through the air when an infected person sneezes or coughs. The disease starts with cold and cough symptoms and gets much worse in one to two weeks. Symptoms usually include a long series of coughs followed by large-scale noise. The Pennsylvania Department of Health strongly recommends the following: If your child coughs, contact your child's doctor immediately. Explain to your doctor that your child has been exposed to a whooping cough and should be evaluated. Your child's doctor may receive a nasopharyngeal culture for pertussis testing. In addition, if your doctor suspects whooping cough, your child will be given an antibiotic to help reduce the likelihood of the disease spreading to others. Your child will be able to return to school after completing the first 5 days of taking the medication. It is very important that after returning to school, your child continues to take his or her medication until he or she is finished. Even if your child is not coughing, you may need to contact your child's doctor and explain to him or her that he or she has been exposed to a whooping cough. Your doctor should give your child an antibiotic to reduce their chance of becoming ill if it falls into one of the following categories: • All persons with pre-existing health conditions that may be worse by whooping cough (eg, immunocompromised, severe asthma) • Contacts that have close contact with infants, pregnant women, or people with previous medical conditions who may be affected by whooping cough. If your child is diagnosed with whooping cough, all household members and other close contacts should also be treated with antibiotics, regardless of their age or vaccination status. Ensuring that children receive all their photos on time is the best way to control whooping cough in the future. In children, diphtheria, tetanus, and cellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) is only given to persons under 7 years of age. Children should receive one dose of DTaP vaccine every 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and between 15 and 18 months of age. In addition, one dose is required before school starts (on or after the fourth birthday). Consult your pediatrician to see if your child is eligible for another dose of DTaP on an accelerated schedule. If you are not sure your child is properly immunized, contact your doctor immediately. • The combined tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) is recommended for children aged 7 to 10 years (if not fully vaccinated) and adolescents and adults as a single dose. It is also recommended for pregnant women during each pregnancy to protect the newborn baby. • Anyone who qualifies for Tdap may receive it regardless of the interval of the latest tetanus-containing vaccine.

A first-grader in a school district in Fayet County was diagnosed with whooping cough.

Frazier school staff sent a letter to parents to warn them that their child might be in close contact with the student.

The Pennsylvania Department of Health has notified a school that a first-grader has been diagnosed with a highly contagious disease.

A cough with donkeys spreads in the air when an infected person sneezes or coughs. The disease starts with cold and cough symptoms and gets much worse in one to two weeks. Symptoms usually include a long series of coughs followed by large-scale noise.

The Pennsylvania Department of Health strongly recommends the following:

  • If your child coughs, contact your child's doctor immediately. Explain to your doctor that your child has been exposed to a whooping cough and should be evaluated. Your child's doctor may receive a nasopharyngeal culture for pertussis testing. In addition, if your doctor suspects whooping cough, your child will be given an antibiotic to help reduce the likelihood of the disease spreading to others. Your child will be able to return to school after completing the first 5 days of taking the medication. It is very important that after returning to school, your child continues to take his or her medication until he or she is finished.
  • Even if your child is not coughing, you may need to contact your child's doctor and explain that he or she has been exposed to a whooping cough. Your doctor should give your child an antibiotic to reduce their chance of becoming ill if it falls into one of the following categories:
    • All persons with pre-existing medical conditions that may be worse by whooping cough (e.g., immunocompromised, severe asthma)
    • Contacts that have close contact with infants, pregnant women or people with previous medical conditions that may be exacerbated by whooping cough
    • All high-risk contacts involving babies or women in the third trimester of pregnancy .
  • If your child is diagnosed with whooping cough, all household members and other close contacts should also be treated with antibiotics, regardless of their age or vaccination status.
  • The belief that children receive all their photos on time is the best way to control whooping cough in the future. In children, diphtheria, tetanus, and cell pertussis vaccine
    (DTaP) is only applicable to those under 7 years of age. Children should receive one dose of DTaP vaccine every 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and between 15 and 18 months of age. In addition, one dose is required before school starts (on or after the fourth birthday). Consult your pediatrician to see if your child is eligible for another dose of DTaP on an accelerated schedule. If you are not sure your child is properly immunized, contact your doctor immediately.
    • The combination tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine is recommended for children aged 7 to 10 years (if not fully vaccinated) and adolescents and adults as a single dose. It is also recommended for pregnant women during each pregnancy to protect the newborn baby.
    • Anyone who qualifies for Tdap may receive it regardless of the interval of the latest tetanus-containing vaccine.

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