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Anxiety led to vaccine reactions in 5 countries



NEW YORK “It is anxiety – not the problem with gunshots – that causes fainting, dizziness and other short-term reactions in dozens of people at coronavirus vaccine clinics in five states,” US health officials said.

Experts say the clusters, described in detail on Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, are an example of a phenomenon that has been chronicled for decades by many different vaccines. In general, some people are so frightened by injections that their anxiety stimulates a physical reaction.

“We knew we would see this because mass clinics for COVID-1

9 vaccines were set up around the world,” said Dr. Noni MacDonald, a Canadian researcher who has studied similar incidents.

The CDC authors say the reports arrived in three days, from April 7 to 9, from clinics in California, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa and North Carolina. The investigation is based on interviews with clinic staff and reports from them.

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Many of the 64 affected either fainted or reported dizziness. Some had nausea or vomiting, and some had heart palpitations, chest pain, or other symptoms. No one got seriously ill.

All received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, and four of the five clinics were temporarily closed while staff tried to find out what was happening. At the time, health officials said they had no reason to suspect a problem with the vaccine itself.

Of the three COVID-19 vaccines approved in the United States, only J&J requires only one dose. This probably makes it more attractive to people who are nervous about the shots and may leave them “more prone to anxiety events,” the CDC report said.

Some of the advertised sites are taking pictures of J&J, said Dr. Tom Shimabukuro, who oversees the CDC’s work to monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccines and is one of the study’s authors.

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