Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ World https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Archaeologists uncover 27 ancient wooden coffins buried for 2,500 years in Egypt

Archaeologists uncover 27 ancient wooden coffins buried for 2,500 years in Egypt



Archaeologists uncover 27 ancient wooden coffins buried for 2,500 years in Egypt in the largest discovery of its kind

  • Archaeologists discovered 13 earlier this month and have since found 14 more
  • Ancient wooden sarcophagi have been buried for about 2,500 years
  • The discovery was made in the ancient necropolis of Saqqara south of Cairo

27 sarcophagi buried 2,500 years ago have been found in Egypt in the largest find of its kind.

Archaeologists working in the ancient Saqqara necropolis near Cairo have uncovered the amazing collection.

Initially, only 13 sarcophagi were discovered earlier this month, but further efforts have uncovered another 14, the BBC reports.

27 sarcophagi buried 2,500 years ago have been found in the ancient Saqqara necropolis near Cairo.  Pictured: Egypt's Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities Mostafa Waziri inspects one of the coffins

27 sarcophagi buried 2,500 years ago have been found in the ancient Saqqara necropolis near Cairo. Pictured: Egypt’s Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities Mostafa Waziri inspects one of the coffins

The sarcophagi have been buried underground for 2,500 years.  13 were discovered initially this month before another 14 were discovered

The sarcophagi have been buried underground for 2,500 years. 13 were discovered initially this month before another 14 were discovered

The archeological export of 27 sarcophagi is considered to be the largest of its kind so far.

The archeological export of 27 sarcophagi is considered to be the largest of its kind so far.

In a statement Saturday, the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquity said: “Initial research shows that these coffins have been completely closed and have not been opened since they were buried.”

The find is believed to be the largest of its kind to date, and a ministry statement said they hope to reveal “more secrets” about the discovery soon.

Along with wooden sarcophagi, the archeological team found smaller statues and artifacts.

Although it was discovered earlier, the ministry delayed announcing the news, while Antiquities Minister Khaled al-Anani could not visit the excavation site alone to inspect the sarcophagi.

Mostafa

Mostafa Vaziri and the team of archaeologists inspect one of the ancient wooden coffins in a burial shaft in the Sakara necropolis

Along with wooden sarcophagi, the archeological team also discovered smaller statues and artifacts.

Along with the wooden sarcophagi, the archeological team also discovered smaller statues and artifacts.

Secretary General of Egypt of the Supreme Council of Antiquities Mostafa Waziri takes one of the sculptures found next to the sarcophagi outside the excavation site

Secretary General of Egypt of the Supreme Council of Antiquities Mostafa Waziri takes one of the sculptures found next to the sarcophagi outside the excavation site

The Saqqara necropolis is located south of Cairo and is part of the ancient capital of Memphis, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

This is also the site of Djoser’s colossal rectangular stepped pyramid.

The sarcophagi were discovered by a team that dug 36 feet down and continued to work to try to make an accurate history of the sarcophagi.

Egypt uses archeological finds as a means of promoting tourism, a sector that is directly affected by travel restrictions imposed in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Advertising


Source link