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Bermuda is entirely in the eye of Hurricane Paulet as a storm island



The entire island of Bermuda was directly in the eye of Hurricane Flight on Monday morning as the storm threatened to bring in more harmful winds and torrential rains as it began to recede.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami said the flight was just above Bermuda at about 6 a.m. before the storm began to slowly recede.

“Hurricane conditions and torrential rains associated with the southern eye wall continue over Bermuda,” the NHC said.

HURRICANE PALLET FOR BERMUDA STRIKE ON SUNDAY NIGHT, FORECASTERS SAY

According to the NHC, Paulette’s glasses will continue to fly over Bermuda for the next few hours.

Satellite images showed the island completely in the middle of the eye of a storm early Monday morning, surrounded on all sides by swirling clouds.

Bermuda Island can be seen directly in the eyes of Hurricane Flight on Monday, September 14, 2020.

Bermuda Island can be seen directly in the eyes of Hurricane Flight on Monday, September 14, 2020.
(NOAA / GOES East)

Those on the island describe being in the eyes as “light winds”, “tree frogs singing” while the surf continues to roar.

Andrew Moore wrote on Twitter that he could even see “several stars and planets” once the clouds cleared.

Flight is currently a Category 2 hurricane with maximum strong winds of 105 mph, with higher gusts moving north-northeast at 13 mph.

“Further strengthening on Tuesday night is likely as the flight accelerates from northeast to east-northeast,” the NHC said. “Gradual weight loss is expected to begin on Wednesday.”

As the storm moves away from Bermuda, hurricane conditions will return to the island from the south and southeast when the southern eye wall passes.

Up to 6 inches of rain is possible on the island, and hurricane conditions subside by mid-morning as tropical storm conditions continue into the early afternoon.

When the storm receded, some on the island described the conditions as “still raging.”

PEACE OF HURRICANE SEASON: THAT’S WHY SEPT. DAY 10 IS MOST LIKELY TO HAVE A TROPICAL STORM

The flight may be over Bermuda, but the storm is creating a stormy sea that will affect the entire east coast of the United States. Life-threatening surf and rip current conditions are possible on Monday.

In addition to Flight, Sally is gathering strength as it seeks the U.S. Gulf Coast as a hurricane.

After a tropical storm, Rene will dissipate on Monday. without threat to land.

Tropical activity in the Atlantic basin on September 14, 2020

Tropical activity in the Atlantic basin on September 14, 2020

Tropical Depression 20 intensified in Tropical Storm Teddy on Monday morning and was expected to turn into a “powerful” hurricane later in the week, forecasters said. This storm is expected to remain in the Central Atlantic without risk to the United States for the next five days.

Another disturbance off the coast of Africa, Tropical Depression 21, formed on Monday in the eastern Atlantic before escalating to Tropical Storm Vicky.

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Historically, September has produced the most tropical activity in the Atlantic basin. The current storms of the name have broken records for how early they formed for the letter, continuing a trend during the 2020 hurricane season in the Atlantic.

The busiest season of hurricanes is September, with activity peaking on September 10.

The busiest season of hurricanes is September, with activity peaking on September 10.
(Fox News)

NOAA forecasters are now calling for up to 25 reported storms with winds of 39 mph or higher; seven to 10 of them could turn into hurricanes. Among these hurricanes, three to six will be large, classified as categories 3, 4 and 5 with winds of 111 mph or higher.

Where tropical storms usually develop in September.

Where tropical storms usually develop in September.
(Fox News)

This is far above the average year. Based on data from 1981 to 2010, these are 12 named storms, six hurricanes and three major hurricanes.

So far this year, there have been 19 names for storms, including six hurricanes and one major hurricane.

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The Atlantic hurricane season in 2020 runs from June 1 to November 30 and includes the names Arthur, Bertha, Cristobal, Dolly, Edouard, Faye, Gonzalo, Hannah, Isaias, Josephine, Kyle, Laura, Marco, Nana, Omar, Paulette, Renee, Sally, Teddy, Vicki and Wilfred.

The names for the hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean in 2020.

The names for the hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean in 2020.
(Fox News)

There is only one name left for this season: Wilfred. Then we will move to the Greek alphabet only for the second time in history.

Adam Klotz and Brandon Noriega of Fox News contributed to this report.


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