Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Health https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Bill Maher states that the link between autism and the MMR vaccine is not crazy

Bill Maher states that the link between autism and the MMR vaccine is not crazy



Real-time host Bill Maher hints that it is "realistic" to suggest a link between vaccines for autism and childhood – a dangerous and debunked theory that puts children's lives at risk.

A striking statement was made by Maher during an interview with controversial physician Dr. Jay Gordon, a pediatrician and fellow at the American Academy of Pediatrics who has gained prominence in the anti-wax community in recent years and advocates for a "balanced, moderate look "regarding vaccines.

As the first guest on the latest issue of Real Time with Bill Maher, the couple discussed vaccines and Gordon shared his own medical history and the shortcomings of modern medicine.

  Dr. J. Gordon

  Bill Maher

Real-time host Bill Maher claims that it is "realistic" to suggest a link between autism and childhood vaccines during an interview with controversial doctor, Dr. Jay Gordon

"You know, to call you this crazy man," he told Gordon, "really, what you just say is [a] slower [vaccination timetable] maybe fewer numbers, and also pick tailored individuals.

"People are different. Family history, that kind of thing. I don't think that's crazy. "

Then Maher supported the anti-vaccine opinion and said it was" realistic "that there could be a connection between autism vaccines and childhood.

" There are all these parents who say, 'I had a normal child , I got the vaccine. "This story continues to appear. It seems more realistic to me if we're just going to be realistic about it.

"Like, it probably happens so infrequently, but you can't say it happens one in a million times, because then one might think, 'Well, I could be that one million.' "So, you scare people so you can't say what a more realistic opinion can be. "

In 2015, Gordon told CBS News that he had signed hundreds of exceptions to his personal beliefs about the school vaccine requirements.

He claims that measles has almost always been a" benign childhood disease "for which parents do not have need to worry.

"This measles outbreak does not pose a great risk to a healthy child," Gordon says. "And quite frankly, I don't think it poses a risk to a healthy child."

  Dr. Jay Gordon has gained prominence in the anti-wax community in recent years and advocates for a "balanced, moderate view" of vaccines [19659018] Dr. J. Gordon has gained prominence in the anti-wax community in recent years and advocates for a "balanced, moderate view" of vaccines.

Dr. J. Gordon has gained prominence in the anti-wax community in recent years. and advocates a "balanced, moderate view" in relation we vaccines

  Maher supported the viewpoint among anti-vaksimerite and said it was "realistic" that there may be a connection between vaccines and autism childhood.

Maher supported the opinion among anti-vaccines and said it was "realistic" that there could be a link between autism vaccines and childhood. [19659009] Gordon claime d that the discussion is closed when it comes to the side effects of vaccines, unlike other treatments.

"When someone gets antibiotics from me that I talk about, there may be a yeast infection, you get diarrhea and a rash. But with vaccines, the discussion is closed. "

Maher was reported by the Huffington Post saying during the interview:" I'm just saying we don't know s ** t.

"We don't know much about how the body works. So how do vaccines fit in, I don't know, all the new chemicals?

" There are thousands of new chemicals, contaminants, irritants. We didn't use all that corn syrup in our bodies, antibiotics. It can be any combination, so I'm a little cautious. "

  Pediatrician Dr. Jay Gordon has gained prominence in the anti-wax community and advocates for a" balanced, moderate view "of vaccines [19659027] Pediatrician Dr. Jay Gordon has gained some notoriety in the anti-wax community and advocates for a "balanced, moderate view" of vaccines

Pediatrician Dr. Jay Gordon has gained some prominence in the anti-wax community and advocates a "balanced, moderate view" of vaccines

health experts and studies have found that there is no link between the life-saving MMR vaccine and autism.

Anti-waxers have defeated the dangerous myth for almost 25 years, after a now-defunct study suggests there is a link between the two.

In March, Danish scientists again shot the controversial theory in the foot by analyzing data from more than 650,000 children given a stab.

MMR protects against measles – a highly contagious viral infection that can be deadly – as well as mumps and rubella.

The World Health Organization has already declared anti-vaccines as one of the top 10 threats to health globally, along with pollution and climate change.

Scientists around the world are still trying to get to the bottom of what causes autism, which affects about one in 100 people.

At present, the medical community believes that the disorder can be caused by a mixture of genes and environmental factors such as exposure to alcohol in the womb.

Lancet published a study in 1995 showing that children who were given MMR were more likely to have bowel disease and autism. The United States and the United Kingdom fell, plunging below the 80% mark in the United Kingdom in the midst of fears.

Dr. Richard Horton, editor of The Lancet, publicly described the research as "fundamentally flawed" in 2004 – nine years after

Dr. Horton claims that Andrew Wakefield, the gastroenterologist behind the paper, was paid from a group of lawsuits against vaccine manufacturers.


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