Brave, the desktop and mobile browser based on the Chromium code, is gaining a lot of steam. The declared mission to protect privacy and block malicious advertising resonates among many users, especially those who are tired of Google’s records for both. Brave’s latest move is the acquisition of Tailcat, a small open source search engine outside Europe.

The result will be a rebranded Brave Search. Brave̵

7;s introductory post lists a set of principles, focusing on confidentiality, the lack of targeted advertising, and the transparency of the algorithm. The latter is crucial, unlike the black box, which is Google’s search algorithm, and the problematic links it has with the company’s advertising and services. The search team publishes an academic article (PDF link) outlining its objectives. These include a system of sophisticated filters called “glasses” provided by independent sources, both corporate and private. In essence, users will be able to choose from a variety of modifiers that will change the way the algorithm ranks content, seeing behind the curtain at each step.

Other features of the upcoming search engine include a paid option without ads, open access to the engine for other platforms and search engines and, of course, deep integration with the Brave browser itself. The most interesting parts of Brave Search do not yet exist – and as of today Tailcat is not working either. Brave currently offers a registration page and a waiting list. There is no data on when Brave Search will be available, either in limited capacity or to the public.

Brave private browser: Fast, secure web browser
Brave private browser: Fast, secure web browser