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CHI Health plans to provide enough staff if hospitalizations increase



CEO Cliff Robertson said that when the first wave of coronavirus struck in March, CHI Health counted 2,000 hospital beds available to patients. I need him, “Robertson said. He said the challenge now is to make sure they have enough staff, especially if there is a jump. Last week, the health care system asked nurses outside the state to be alert. prepared if trends continue to develop over the next three or four weeks, “Robertson said. Robertson said he had noticed fewer cases of coronavirus in health care hospitals.” Not so much the intensive care unit requirements – certainly more “Few patients on ventilators may be because we now have better treatments that we know can stop the disease from getting worse,”

; Robertson said. He also praised rural hospitals, which now turn less to metro stations. Just because you’re infected with a coronavirus doesn’t mean, “A,” you need a hospital, and it certainly doesn’t mean you have to be transported out of your community, “Robertson said. As for the eligible operations, he does not believe they will be postponed, as they were earlier this year. He said this posed a significant risk to these patients. “What we’re trying to avoid is shutting down the entire health care system and not providing care to people who otherwise need it,” Robertson said.

CEO Cliff Robertson said that when the first wave of coronavirus struck in March, CHI Health counted 2,000 hospital beds available to patients.

“We don’t need to build tent hospitals because we have a lot of bricks and hospital facilities if we need them,” Robertson said.

He said the challenge now is to ensure they have enough staff, especially if there is a jump. Last week, the health system asked nurses outside the country to be on standby.

“So we are prepared if the trends continue to develop over the next three or four weeks,” Robertson said.

Robertson said he had seen fewer cases of coronavirus in CHI hospitals.

“[There are] not so much intensive care requirements – certainly fewer ventilator patients, maybe that’s because we now have better treatments that we know can stop the disease from getting worse, “Robertson said.

He also congratulated rural hospitals, which are now less likely to look for metro stations.

“Just because you’re infected with the coronavirus doesn’t mean ‘A,’ you need a hospital, and it certainly doesn’t mean you have to be taken out of your community,” Robertson said.

As for the elective operations, he does not believe that they will be postponed, as they were earlier this year. He said this posed a significant risk to these patients.

“What we’re trying to avoid is shutting down the entire health care system and not providing care to people who otherwise need it,” Robertson said.


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