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Coronavirus stroke can help fight cancer, chronic pain … and even Alzheimer’s disease



Joan Wakefield barely manages to walk for most of six months. The 72-year-old man from Stockport was replaced on his knee in October and has since suffered scarring infections causing agonizing pain.

Then earlier this month, she received the first dose of AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine. “I woke up the next morning and the pain and stiffness in my legs disappeared,” she said.

“I couldn’t believe it.” I joked with my partner if the vaccine had anything to do with it. Before that, I couldn’t even bend my leg. Now I can extend it completely and even put on my shoes and socks. I am optimistic that I will be able to return to work sooner rather than later, now.

It seems ridiculous ̵

1; a vaccine designed to protect against a virus can somehow improve other completely unrelated elements of health.

But Joan Wakefield is far from alone.

A man receives his Covid-19 vaccinations at Litchfield Cathedral, Staffordshire earlier this week

A man receives his Covid-19 vaccinations at Litchfield Cathedral, Staffordshire earlier this week

Last month in the mail on Sunday, GP Eli Cannon wrote about the curious case of a man with Lyme disease who found that his long-term fatigue had evaporated just days after receiving the Covid vaccine. Dozens of you have written to tell such miraculous tales.

One has seen stubborn eczema patches on the arms, legs and midst mysteriously disappear within hours of the stroke. Another claims that the dizzying vertigo she had been battling for 25 years disappeared four days after her shot.

What to read, watch and do

READ

Life Science: 219 Reasons to Rethink Your Daily Routine, by Dr. Stuart Farimond

Does daily exercise bring as many long-term benefits as you think? A scientist reveals the truth about the daily health hacks that many of us live with.

DK, £ 15.99

Life Science: 219 Reasons to Rethink Your Daily Routine, by Dr. Stuart Farimond

Life Science: 219 Reasons to Rethink Your Daily Routine, by Dr. Stuart Farimond

I’M WATCHING

Dispatches: History of a doctor

A look at the wall in Covid’s wards, courtesy of Dr. Saleyha Ahsan, who filmed her daily life during the second wave. An exciting and disturbing insight into tolls for NHS employees, revealing how close so many have reached the breaking point.

Tomorrow, 20:00, Channel 4

Dispatches: History of a doctor

Dispatches: History of a doctor

DO IT

Have a ceramic party

Studies show that performing arts and crafts can reduce anxiety levels – and sculptural pottery has been shown to be particularly soothing.

sculpd.co.uk, £ 39 for a set for two. Larger kits are available.

Meanwhile, a woman writes that her husband enjoyed a good night’s sleep for the first time since he was diagnosed with a sleep disorder 15 years ago. Even stranger is that some claim to have stayed in better health because they became infected with the virus.

A 95-year-old resident of the nursing home is described by her daughter and is suddenly “alert and alive” after experiencing Kovid last month.

“Before, my mother was very fragile, she was losing weight, and her voice was losing strength. We were prepared for the end not to be far away, “wrote Rose Ellis of Ilford, Essex.

“Four weeks after recovering from Kovid, her voice is louder.” She stood at the window for ten minutes and put on 3 pounds.

Most readers suggest that the stroke – or the infection itself – has caused the immune system to take action and attack other irritating health problems. And they may be right. Scientists have documented the unexpected benefits of vaccines for decades – known in medicine as “non-specific effects”.

Studies in the 1970s and 1980s by Danish scientist Peter Aabi found that mass measles vaccination in West African communities reduced the risk of infant death by a third – but only four percent of that decline was explained by more people. measles survivors.

Also in the 1970s, Russian scientists found that vaccinating the population against polio reduced mortality from influenza and other infections by up to 80%.

More recently, Dutch and Greek researchers have reported startling early results from experiments on whether giving a vaccine to the elderly against the bacterial infection tuberculosis – BGC jab – can protect against other common infections that often land fragile and vulnerable people in hospital.

Almost twice as many infections were seen in the placebo group as in the vaccinated participants.

And the BCG vaccine is already being used to treat patients with bladder cancer with non-invasive tumors – it is given directly into the bladder to help the immune system fight cancer.

Moreover, patients with bladder cancer who receive this therapy are less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease, according to a recent Israeli study. But why?

Scientists are not sure about the exact mechanism. Some do suggest that vaccines can “train” the immune system by strengthening it.

But Professor Sheena Cruikshank, an immunologist at the University of Manchester, did not take advantage of this theory and insisted that there was a different explanation.

She says: “The protection we see against other health problems in those who have had measles and BCG vaccines is an advantage of not having suffered from these diseases in your younger years.

“Suffering from measles, tuberculosis or any other infection we vaccinate against can have long-term harmful effects on our immune system.”

Studies show that they weaken the response to threats and provoke systemic inflammation. Over time, this increases the risk of many diseases.

For those experiencing miraculous recovery from the Covid-19 crash, Professor Sheena Cruikshank, an immunologist at the University of Manchester, pictured says the explanation lies in our emotional response to it.

For those experiencing miraculous recovery from the Covid-19 crash, Professor Sheena Cruikshank, an immunologist at the University of Manchester, pictured says the explanation lies in our emotional response to it.

“People vaccinated against these infections, in turn, will be less likely to suffer from other diseases as a result.”

As for those who are experiencing miraculous recovery after the Covid-19 crash, Professor Cruickshank says the explanation lies in our emotional response to it. “The pandemic was extremely stressful and we often underestimate the effect of stress on our immune system,” she said.

Vax fact

According to the World Health Organization, vaccines prevent more than 2.5 million deaths worldwide each year.

She explains that elevated stress hormones interfere with the ability of immune cells to target infections. She says: “That’s why we tend to catch colds or catch bacterial infections when we’re stressed and exhausted.

“It is also this response that in vulnerable people leads to an exacerbation of inflammatory conditions such as eczema – as the immune system is disrupted.”

Dr. Cruickshank suspects that the vaccine will be a relief for many, as it will immediately reduce stress levels. The beneficial effect on the immune system can be immediate. It’s amazing, “she added.

She also emphasized that the type of vaccine used to prevent Covid-19 was significantly different from that used in previous studies.

“Measles and tuberculosis punctures are all called ‘live’ vaccines.”

“They involve injecting a small amount of a weakened version of the virus or bacteria that causes the disease.

“It helps the immune system recognize it when it sees it in larger doses, so it’s quicker to react.

“But all Covid-19 vaccines do not work by injecting viral particles, but by the genetic instructions our immune cells need to make a small portion of them.

“It is unlikely to have any effect on immune cells to which they are not specifically designed.”

Joan Wakefield has no doubt about the cure for her squeaky knee. She writes: “Once I read about other people who see the miraculous effects of the vaccine, it all made sense.

“I totally believe that’s the case with me.”


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