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Covid-19 nasal spray protects against infection for up to 48 hours



Anti-COVID-19 nasal spray, which protects against coronavirus infection for up to 48 hours, is “ready for use in humans” and can be mass-produced in WEEKS, scientists say

  • The spray uses compounds already approved by regulators for human use
  • Researchers at the University of Birmingham sprayed it and said it was “ready to use”
  • The spray has been shown to inhibit coronavirus activity in laboratory experiments
  • Maximum and social distancing will be used in high-risk scenarios

A nasal spray that is said to provide protection against Covid-19 infection for up to 48 hours may soon be available in the UK.

Chemicals already approved for human use are combined to make the spray, and laboratory studies show that it inhibits the ability of the coronavirus to bind to human cells.

The spray is made from two main ingredients called carrageenan and gelan, both of which are used in food science as thickeners.

As the ingredients have already been approved for human use, the developers say the product is ready for use as soon as it receives the green light from the authorities.

Chemicals already approved for human use are combined to make the spray, and laboratory studies show that it inhibits the ability of the coronavirus to bind to human cells.

Chemicals already approved for human use are combined to make the spray, and laboratory studies show that it inhibits the ability of the coronavirus to bind to human cells.

Lead author of the paper, Dr. Richard Mox, said: “This spray is made from readily available products that are already used in food and medicine, and we have deliberately incorporated these conditions into our design process.

“This means that with the right partners, we can start mass production within weeks.”

The gelan component allows the spray to be applied as a fine mist and covers the entire inner part of the nose.

If the spray comes in contact with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, it captures, infects and expels it either by ingestion or by blowing the nose.

Researchers behind the project at the University of Birmingham say the spray can be especially useful in risky situations, such as health workers, flights or classrooms.

The gelan component allows the spray to be applied as a fine mist and once in the nose, it captures and encompasses SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes Covid-19, and it is neutralized by swallowing or blowing the nose (available)

The gelan component allows the spray to be applied as a fine mist and once in the nose, it captures and encompasses SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes Covid-19, and it is neutralized by swallowing or blowing the nose (available)

Nasal drops made with chicken coronavirus antibodies “give short-term immunity to Covid-19”

Nasal drops made with coronavirus antibodies collected from chicken eggs may give short-term immunity to Covid-19, scientists say.

Chickens produce antibodies against infections just like humans, and anti-infection chemicals are also found in high concentrations in their eggs.

The researchers used the birds to quickly produce antibodies against the coronavirus and extracted them from their yolks in the hope that they could help humans.

They believe that if chicken antibodies are integrated into a nasal spray or drops, they can provide short-term protection against Covid-19.

In situations where the risk of transmission is high, scientists predict the use of the spray along with pre-existing measures such as social distancing and face masks.

“Products like these do not replace existing measures such as wearing masks and washing hands, which will continue to be vital to prevent the spread of the virus,” added Dr. Moakes.

“What this spray will do, however, is add a second layer of protection to prevent and delay transmission.”

The results of the latest tests are available as a prepress on the bioRxiv server.

Dr Simon Clark, an associate professor of cell microbiology at the University of Reading, told MailOnline: “Some people use similar nasal sprays for the common cold, but rely on people noticing symptoms in time, but Covid-19 only seems to cause symptoms after the virus reaches the lungs; the spray will not reach that far in the airways in significant quantities.

“It remains to be seen how, if it is effective, it can be used. It is possible to take it continuously to prevent infection. ”

Stanford scientists have had a similar thought to the Birmingham academics and are also in the process of creating a preventative nasal spray.

But instead of using permitted compounds found in many foods, they use chicken antibodies collected from their eggs.

Chickens produce antibodies against infections just like humans, and anti-infection chemicals are also found in high concentrations in their eggs.

However, while the scientists behind the project disagree with its potential applications, others are more skeptical.

Simon Clark, an associate professor of cell microbiology at the University of Reading, told The Times: “There may be some benefits, but it suggests that people only become infected through the nose.

“This strategy will not stop the infection through the mouth or eyes.”

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