Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Health https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ CVS told staff to hide workers’ COVID-19 cases from patients

CVS told staff to hide workers’ COVID-19 cases from patients



  • A leaked e-mail from the district leader of CVS told staff not to inform patients that their prescriptions were fulfilled by someone who tested positive for COVID-19.
  • CVS spokesman Michael De Angelis told Business Insider, “It is not our policy to prohibit our pharmacies from informing patients if their prescription has been completed when an employee who has tested positive for COVID-19 has worked at the pharmacy. “
  • The technician from CVS in Georgia, who shared the email with Business Insider, said the company threatened to discipline or fire staff if it told customers about confirmed cases of COVID-1
    9.
  • At least 14 CVS employees in the United States have told Business Insider that CVS has a staff harassment pattern and grossly disregards customer safety.
  • Visit the Business Insider homepage for more stories.

A leaked email revealed that the district leader of CVS had instructed staff not to tell patients that their medications were full of someone who had tested positive for COVID-19.

CVS spokesman Michael De Angelis told Business Insider, “It is not our policy to prohibit our pharmacies from informing patients if their prescription was completed when an employee who tested positive for COVID-19 worked at the pharmacy. “

A technician from CVS in Georgia shared the internal email with Business Insider. The email from the district leader asked employees to track which recipes were executed by a COVID-positive employee and to withdraw them from the shelves. However, if the patient has already taken any of these prescriptions, the standard policy is “DO NOT call outreach”.

The technician said staff were threatened with disciplinary action or termination if they told customers that someone in the store had tested positive for COVID-19.

“We were told not to contact anyone or to notify anyone,” the technician told Business Insider.

At least 14 CVS employees across the country have approached Business Insider, claiming that CVS has a pattern of “harassment” of staff, as well as gross disregard for the safety of both staff and customers. Business Insider provided anonymity to all sources for workplace security reasons and personally confirmed their identities.

Staff said CVS ignored incidents with potential coronavirus exposure.

DeAngelis confirmed to Business Insider last week that CVS’s policy is to allow employees to work after exposing someone to a positive test. DeAngelis said CVS allows asymptomatic employees who have not tested positive for COVID-19 to work if they wear surgical masks, self-monitor for symptoms and if their temperature is measured before and after each shift for 14 days after exposure.

Workers can also request quarantine leave if they are exposed to a colleague who has tested positive, DeAngelis added.

But after the Georgia technician showed symptoms and gave a positive test, staff who worked closely with the colleague were instructed not to test “because they can’t leave anyone else jobless,” the technician said.

Gag’s rules, which employers forbid workers from talking about COVID-19 cases, are becoming common, Bloomberg reported. Workers often live in fear of being punished or fired for informing customers of a COVID-19 case in the workplace.

“In many places, workplace exposure is leading to a pandemic,” David Michaels, an epidemiologist and professor at George Washington University, told Bloomberg.

Correction: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that CVS’s policy is to allow employees who have tested positive for COVID-19 but are asymptomatic of COVID-19 to continue working. CVS allows employees who are exposed to COVID-positive individuals to continue working while self-monitoring for symptoms. Positive asymptomatic patients with COVID-19 are offered 14 days paid leave.

Explanation: An earlier version of this article suggested that an email instructed staff not to tell patients that their medications were being filled by someone who tested positive for COVID-19, according to CVS Health Corporation. The email came from a district leader, not from CVS Heath corporate.

ChargingSomething is loading.

Source link