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Day 4 Finals Live Summary



2021 OLYMPIC SWIMMING TRIALS IN THE USA

This is the last day of the Second Wave Olympic Trials in the United States, and the last few places to transfer to next week’s Second Wave will be taken.

Keep refreshing this page for live updates, event by event of all Omaha actions.

WOMEN’S 200 IM – FINALS

  • World record: Katinka Hosu (HUN) – 2: 06.12 (2015)
  • American record: Ariana Kukors – 2: 06.15 (2009)
  • US Open record: Kathleen Baker (USA) – 2: 08.32 (2018)
  • Adolescent World Record: Yu Yiting (CHN) ̵
    1; 2: 09.64 (2021)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Katinka Hosu (HUN) – 2: 06.58
  • 2016 Olympic Champion in the USA: Maya Dirado – 2: 09.54
  • Wave I Cut: 2: 17.39
  • Wave cutting II: 2: 15.26

Podium:

  1. Kate McCarville (SPA) – 2: 15.09
  2. Ella Bathurst (TEAM) – 2: 15.64
  3. Malia Rausch (ASC) – 2: 16.42

In the first and only 9-man final of the match, Kate McCarville of SPA struggled with freestyle to overtake Ella Bathurst, roaring for a new best life and progress in 2nd wave II. McCarville touched behind Ella Bathurst at 150, but a stellar 31.36 in the last 50 caused McCarville to explode in the lead as she approached the final.

It’s amazing that Ella Bathurst made her move against McCarville on a breaststroke, which was a small blow for her in the preliminary stages. Bathurst led the field on his back, splitting 33.35, which was the only 33 in the field.

ASC’s Malia Rausch almost went through an unthinkable chase in this race, throwing a 30.39 freestyle jaw. To give you an idea of ​​how fast this 200 IM free split for women is, Rausch’s 30.39 would be the second fastest split in the 200 IM women’s final at the 2019 World Cup, behind only China’s Ye Shiwen (30.28). . Rausch won 200 free early in the match.

After the drama of getting a DQ, then restored to A Tennessee’s A final, Trude Rothrock posted 2: 16.73 for 4th tonight, swimming off the 0 lane.

MEN’S 200 IM – FINALS

  • World record: Ryan Lochte (USA) – 1: 54.00 (2011)
  • American record: Ryan Lochte – 1: 54.00 (2011)
  • US Open record: Ryan Lochte (USA) – 1: 54.56 (2009)
  • Junior World Record: Hubert Kos (HUN) – 1: 56.99 (2021)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Michael Phelps (USA) – 1: 54.66
  • 2016 US Olympic Champion: Michael Phelps – 1: 55.91
  • Wave I Cut: 2: 04.09
  • Wave cutting II: 2: 03.02

Podium:

  1. Tristan DeWitt (ISC) – 2: 02.03
  2. Spencer Arno-Rees (NAAC) – 2: 02.43
  3. Kyle Maas (MLA) – 2: 03.03

Tristan DeWitt controlled this race for most of his duration, only losing the lead in the back lap. During his interview, DeWitt expressed how he fed the energy of this match and how happy he was to return to a competitive atmosphere. With the swim, DeWitt threw 2 seconds from his personal record. He led the way with a quick chest split of 34.7.

Spencer Arno-Rees, on the other hand, was in second place for most of the race, leading only in the back 50. MLA’s Kyle Maas was strong with DeWitt and Arno-Rees in the first half of the race, but was a little behind. along the chest.

50 FREE WOMEN – FINALS

  • World record: Sarah Sostrom (SWE) – 23.67 (2017)
  • American record: Simone Manuel – 23.97 (2017)
  • US Open record: Simone Manuel (USA) – 24.10 (2018)
  • Adolescent World Record: Claire Curzan (USA) – 24.17 (2021)
  • Olympic champion 2016: Pernille Blume (DEN) – 24.07
  • 2016 US Olympic Champion: Weizell Abbey – 24.28
  • Wave I Cut: 25.99
  • Wave cutting II: 25.65

Podium

  1. Missy Cundiff (TRIB) – 25.46
  2. Camille Spink (NCAP) – 25.54 (TIE-2nd)
  3. Anna Mish (STAC) – 25.54 (TIE-2nd)

Shortly after our first final of 9 swimmers in the competition, we had another unique final. The 50 free ladies gave us our first draw for 2nd place, with both Camille Spink from NCAP and Anna Moesch from STAC touching at 25.54. In the event of a tie for 2nd, both swimmers advance to Wave II, so Spink and Moesch will advance along with winner Missy Cundiff.

Spink’s swim was personally the best, just one touch faster than this morning. The 16-year-old girl is now in 24th place for all time in 15-16 girls 50 free rankings. Both Cundiff and Moesch also set personal records and all 3 women were below the Wave II standard.

In fact, all 7 best swimmers were below the Wave II standard of 25.65. Taylor Petrak of Ohio finished in 4th place, posting 25.59, while Christina Pagel of ISC surfaced 25.60 for 5th place. There was a tie for 6th, with both Kyleen Winter (QSS) and Kobe Melton of Arkansas swimming 25.65.

MEN’S 50 FREE FINALS

  • World record: Cesar Cielo (BRA) – 20.91 (2009)
  • American record: single Villasenor – 21.04 (2019)
  • US Open record: Cesar Cielo (BRA) – 21.14 (2009)
  • Junior World Record: Michael Andrew (USA) – 21.75 (2017)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Anthony Erwin (USA) – 21.40
  • 2016 US Olympic Champion: Nathan Adrian – 21.51
  • Wool cutting: 23.19
  • Wave cutting II: 22.71

Podium

  1. Jack Armstrong (BATS) – 22.55
  2. Eric Anderson (NLSA) – 22.57
  3. Matthew Essing (TUS) – 22.63

BATS’s Jack Armstrong posted his best life in a super tight finish, advancing to the Wave II match. NLSA Eric Anderson was right behind, also advancing with a new personal best of 22.57. Both Armstrong and Anderson, as well as 3rd place finish Matthew Essing (25.63) and 4th place Chris Gilliano (22.65) were below the Wave II standard of 22.71.

The 18-year-old Anderson climbed to a tie for # 18 of all time in the standings for 17-18 boys. Giuliano’s 22.65 is already tied for # 22 for all time 17-18, and is now only 17.

WOMEN’S 200 BREASTS – FINALS

  • World record: Rikke Moller Pedersen (DEN) – 2: 19.11 (2013)
  • American record: Rebecca Sony – 2: 19.59 (2012)
  • US Open record: Rebecca Sony (USA) – 2: 20.38 (2009)
  • World Junior Record: Victoria Zeynep Gunes (ENG) – 2: 19.64 (2015)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Ri Caneto (JPN) – 2: 20.30
  • 2016 Olympic Champion in the USA: Lily King – 2: 24.08
  • Wave I Cut: 2: 33.29
  • Wave cutting II: 2: 30.49

Podium

  1. Gracie Wyant (SYS) – 2: 31.10
  2. Abigail Herscu (LAC) – 2: 31.53
  3. Christina Murphy (AZTC) – 2: 31.89

Gracie Weyant shaved 0.05 seconds of his life best on the way to winning the race and advancing to the Wave II match. Both Weyant and 2nd place finisher Abigail Herscu made their moves to the 2nd 100 of the race. Weyant, on the other hand, was in his thickness throughout the race, touching 3rd place in both the 50m and 100m turns. Then she kicked him at speed, moved to 2nd on a turn of 150 meters and overtook the lead in the last lap.

Herscu’s back half was much more dramatic. She touched 8th at 50 meters, 1.5 seconds behind the lead, then climbed to 5th half. She then moved to 4th place in the 3rd 50, then jumped to 2nd position in the final. Herscu’s time was also the best in his life with 0.2 seconds.

The final winner from B Denis Phelan touched with 2: 31.85, which would put her in 3rd place in the A final

MEN’S 200 BREASTS – FINALS

  • World record: Anton Chupkov (RUS) – 2: 06.12 (2019)
  • American record: Josh Prenot – 2: 07.17 (2016)
  • US Open record: Josh Prenot (USA) – 2: 07.17 (2016)
  • Junior World Record: Qin Haiyan (CHN) – 2: 07.35 (2017)
  • Olympic champion 2016: Dmitry Balandin (KAZ) – 2: 07.46
  • 2016 US Olympic Champion: Josh Prenot – 2: 07.17
  • Wave I Cut: 2: 17.89
  • Wave cutting II: 2: 15.28

Podium

  1. Alec Cullen (UCSB) – 2: 14.38
  2. Jacob Frick (NCAP) – 2: 14.40
  3. Coleman Modglin (ZSC) – 2: 15.49

During this wave that I meet, there were many photo finishes and we just got another one at the end of the meeting. UCSB’s Alec Cullen and 18-year-old Jacob Frick of NCAP went down to the wire in the men’s 200 breasts, both of whom scored best while winning seats at the Wave II.

The farthest pair the pair received during the race was 0.31 seconds and it was 50. Frick was stronger in the middle of the 100, splitting 1: 08.88, while Cullen was 1: 09.32 at the same distance. Cullen entered the match with a personal record of 2: 15.77, while Frick was 2: 15.71 before that match.

With the swim, Jacob Frick climbed to # 32 of all time for 17-18 boys in the event.

1500 FREE FOR WOMEN – FINAL TO FINAL

  • World record: Katie Ledeki (USA) – 15: 20.48 (2018)
  • American record: Katie Ledeki – 15: 20.48 (2018)
  • US Open record: Katie Ledeki (USA) – 15: 20.48
  • Junior World Record: Katie Ledeki (USA) – 15: 28,36 (2014)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: N / A (New 2021 Olympic Event)
  • 2016 US Olympic Champion: N / A (2021 New Olympic Event)
  • Wave I Cut: 16: 49.19
  • Wave cutting II: 16: 44.60

Results

  1. Christine Cornish (BAD) – 16: 42.63
  2. Audrey Coffey (HUSK) – 16: 49.09
  3. Olivia Lindorfer (Washington) – 16: 55.85
  4. Aurora Roghair (IFLY) – 16: 57.40
  5. Julie Arzave (TAC) – 17: 03.38
  6. Hailey Pike (BA) – 17: 26.33

Christine Cornish took the most of the opportunity by speeding up early and doing the best job of all in the field, keeping her pace. She posted 16: 42.63 to win the race convincingly, taking 3 seconds of her life at her best. . The 17-year-old is now right in the top 100 for 17-18 girls and will have another chance in the race in about a week.

Cornish swims consecutively, splitting 5: 30.28 in the first 500 meters, 5: 06.03 in the second 500 meters and 5: 06.22 in the last 500 meters. Runner-up Audrey Coffey was right with Coffey in the first few hundred meters of the race, but Cornish during the last 1000 meters of the race.

MEN 1500 FREE – FINAL TO FINAL

  • World record: Sun Yang (CHN) – 14: 31.02 (2012)
  • American record: Conor Jaeger – 14: 39.48 (2016)
  • US Open Record: Peter Vanderkay (USA) – 14: 45.54 (2008)
  • World record for juniors: Franco Grgic (CRO) – 14: 46.09 (2019)
  • 2016 Olympic Champion: Gregorio Paltrinieri (ITA) – 14: 34.57
  • Champion of the 2016 Olympic Trials in the USA: Conor Jaeger – 14: 47.61
  • Wave I Cut: 15: 44,89
  • Wave cutting II: 15: 35,76

Podium

  1. Joshua Brown (HIGH) – 15: 35.94
  2. Owen Lloyd (NCS) – 15: 36.24
  3. Jake Narvid (TENN) – 15: 38.69

Winner Joshua Brown did an excellent swim in his own race, keeping pace while allowing Jake Narvid to take the race quickly. Brown Negative split his swim, posting 7: 48.49 in the first 750 meters and returning home in 7: 47.55. Runner-up Owen Lloyd also split his race negatively, splitting 7: 49.43 / 7: 46.81. Brown missed a few tenths of a second with his swim and will get another shot in a week. Lloyd threw just over 4 seconds from his personal best and will also get another shot next week.

It looked like Narvid was about to run away (or rather swim) in the heat, but for the last few hundred meters, Brown and Lloyd closed quickly, ahead of the 18-year-old, who was fading. Narvid led the race the fastest, turning 58.09 to 100, before settling at a high rate of 1: 02-low 1:03 for most of the race. Regardless of the way he swam, Narvid’s time was still personally best at 4 seconds.




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