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Denton County officials confirm death of Frisco woman linked to COVID-19



Denton County Public Health reported on August 6 the death of a Frisco woman in the 1980s as a result of COVID-19. (Community impact staff)

Denton County Public Health reported on August 6 the death of a Frisco woman in the 1980s as a result of COVID-19.

No additional patient information has been published.

“We will pray for this woman and her loved ones,” Frisco Mayor Jeff Cheney said in a statement. “Every time we learn of another Frisco death, it sadly reminds us how important it is to practice social distancing, wear masks and wash our hands often. Let everyone [do] our part to slow down the spread. “

This is the sixth confirmed death of a COVID-1

9 patient at Frisco since the coronavirus pandemic began in March. The first death, announced on April 4, was that of a 67-year-old Frisco woman with major health complications. The second announced on June 3 is Frisco’s 89-year-old man with basic health conditions. The third death, announced on July 10, was Frisco’s husband in his 40s. The fourth, announced on July 20, is also Frisco’s husband in his 40s. The fifth death, announced on July 22, was a 93-year-old Frisco man with basic health conditions.

A statement from Denton County said that this latest death due to COVID-19 had brought the county’s total deaths to 57.

“Any death related to COVID-19 is a loss, and we keep this individual’s family in our thoughts and prayers,” said Denton County Judge Andy Eds. “If we can continue to wear masks, wash our hands often, count social distances and limit gatherings to less than 10 years, we are cautiously optimistic that community betrayal may continue in a downward trend.”

The city reported 18 new cases of coronavirus in Frisco on August 6th, with the city’s total number ranging from March to 866, according to the city’s public health information board.




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