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Doctors and community leaders discuss COVID-19’s reluctance to vaccinate among minorities



Penn State Health doctors joined community leaders on Friday to talk about the impact of COVID-19 on minority communities and why there is a reluctance to vaccinate. Studies show that only 40% to 45% of people of color want to be vaccinated. “We are not saying we will not get it. We’re just saying we don’t want to be your guinea pigs, “said panelist Yasmin Coleman. . ” African Americans and other minority populations have been exposed to medical experiments. “We can look back at the history of perspectives like the Tuskigi experiment,” said Dr. Karima Fitzgerald. Community leaders point to inequalities in the distribution of vaccines and communications. Reaching out to these communities to allay fears about the vaccine̵

7;s effectiveness and potential side effects is the goal of the roundtable and future discussions on Friday, with experts saying the key is education and information they hope to provide through social media and virtual town halls.

Penn State Health doctors joined community leaders on Friday to talk about the impact of COVID-19 on minority communities and why there is a reluctance to vaccinate.

Studies show that only 40% to 45% of people of color want to be vaccinated.

“We are not saying we will not get it. We’re just saying we don’t want to be your guinea pigs, “said Mr Yasmin Coleman.

Participants in the roundtable, organized by the Pennsylvania Public Health Administration’s Office for Diversity, Justice and Inclusion, said distrust of the medical community dates back years.

“African Americans and other minority populations have been exposed to medical experiments. We can look back at the history of perspectives like Tuskigi’s experiment, “said Dr. Karima Fitzgerald.

Community leaders point to inequalities in the distribution of vaccines and communications.

“If those assigned are not reflecting the communities they serve, then there will be a barrier,” said Carl Singleton of the Pennsylvania Coalition for Diversity.

Reaching out to these communities to allay fears about the effectiveness of the vaccine and potential side effects is the goal of the roundtable and future discussions on Friday. Experts say the key is education and the information they hope to provide through social media and virtual town halls.


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