Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Health https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ DR. MICHAEL MUSLEY: Can overeating be a sign that your body lacks nutrients?

DR. MICHAEL MUSLEY: Can overeating be a sign that your body lacks nutrients?



For most people, the last 12 months have been really difficult, but some businesses are thriving – 2020 seems to have been a fantastic year for supplement manufacturers, with nearly 500 million UK sales in the UK, a record 14% compared to 2019.

We swallowed their products in record numbers, partly because we are all healthier, but also in the hope of protecting ourselves and our loved ones from Covid-19.

But to what extent was this money lost? Which of us really lacks vitamins or minerals?

Let’s start with vitamin D, which I take in pill form during the winter months.

The Curtin University team suggests that in addition to vitamin and mineral deficiencies being more common in overweight or obese people, this lack of nutrients can in turn contribute to overeating, causing a vicious circle where your brain, knowing Being short of important nutrients will make you eat less consciously to compensate for the deficiency

The Curtin University team suggests that in addition to being more common in people who are overweight or obese, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, this lack of nutrients can in turn contribute to overeating, causing a vicious circle where your brain, knowing Being short of important nutrients will make you eat less consciously to compensate for the deficiency

Vitamin D is good for your bones, but it is also vital for a properly functioning immune system and there is strong evidence that it can protect you from the effects of respiratory infections, including Covid-19.

Most of our vitamin D is generated by the sun’s effects on the skin, but about one in five Britons does not get enough, especially between September and March, when the sun in the UK is too weak.

But some people are much more affected than others. A recent report found high levels among some ethnic minorities.

A study by the University of South Australia, which looked at more than 440,000 Britons, found that 57% of people of Asian descent were severely deficient in vitamin D in the winter and spring, and half were still deficient in the summer and fall.

The next most affected group were black participants (39% of whom were deficient in vitamin D in winter and 31% in summer).

The NHS recommends that these groups take supplements throughout the year. Another large group of people who tend to have low levels of vitamin D and lack other essential micronutrients are those who are overweight or obese.

Vitamin D is good for your bones, but it is also vital for a properly functioning immune system and there is strong evidence that it can protect you from the effects of respiratory infections, including Covid-19.

Vitamin D is good for your bones, but it is also vital for a properly functioning immune system and there is strong evidence that it can protect you from the effects of respiratory infections, including Covid-19.

This is partly because people who are significantly overweight tend to eat less nutritious food, but also because being overweight, especially around the abdomen, leads to chronic inflammation – and if you have an inflamed gut, it can reduce the amount of nutrients. which you absorb.

There are also studies that show that if you have a lot of body fat, it can “steal” vitamin D from your blood, reducing the amount available to the rest of the body. Vitamin D deficiency is much more common in obese people than those with a healthy weight (although taking a supplement corrects this).

While doing a Channel 4 series that included helping overweight volunteers lose some of their Covid pounds with my Fast 800 diet, I was shocked to find out how many of those we tested were deficient in vitamins and minerals.

Surprisingly few studies have looked at the vitamin status of people with a high body mass index (BMI), but those who have had troubling findings.

In a study published last year by Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia, 127 people, all overweight or obese, kept a detailed record of what they ate and drank.

The researchers also performed blood tests to measure levels of vitamins A, B12, C, D, E and folic acid, as well as some minerals, including iron, iodine, calcium, potassium, magnesium and zinc.

Although their food diaries suggest that volunteers get enough of these essential nutrients, their blood tests tell a different story. It turned out that most of the participants were severely deficient in vitamin A, vitamin D, calcium, potassium, magnesium and zinc.

Which suggests that whatever is said in their food diaries, they have not eaten enough of the right foods, or their overweight has significantly impaired their ability to absorb and use the micronutrients they have consumed.

One of the shocking findings is that despite the fact that Western Australia is hot and sunny for most of the year, 89% of participants are severely deficient in vitamin D.

Perhaps this is because the fear of skin cancer means that Australians are particularly aware of the need to protect themselves from the sun.

But even worse, only 8% of the volunteers had healthy calcium levels and almost all of them were deficient in vitamin A, magnesium, potassium and zinc. The only vitamin they had in abundance was vitamin C, which many took as a supplement.

One of the shocking findings is that despite the fact that Western Australia is hot and sunny for most of the year, 89% of participants are severely deficient in vitamin D.

One of the shocking findings is that despite the fact that Western Australia is hot and sunny for most of the year, 89% of participants are severely deficient in vitamin D.

All of this is important because vitamin A boosts the immune system and keeps the eyes and skin healthy, while potassium plays a vital role in preventing hypertension (high blood pressure) and helping our heart muscles work properly.

Zinc is needed for wound healing and helps fight viral infections, while magnesium is not only important for a healthy body and brain, but also helps regulate your weight. Low levels are associated with depression and poor sleep and have powerful anti-inflammatory effects.

And not only is calcium needed for healthy teeth and bones, but it can also help with weight loss. This is because calcium binds to the fats in your diet, ensuring that less of them is absorbed.

The Curtin University team suggests that in addition to vitamin and mineral deficiencies being more common in overweight or obese people, this lack of nutrients can in turn contribute to overeating, causing a vicious circle where your brain, knowing Being short of important nutrients will make you eat more unconsciously to compensate for the deficiency.

Unfortunately, measuring vitamin and mineral levels is not easy.

You can do specific tests for NHS if you have obvious symptoms of a deficiency, such as anemia, but if you want to get a general picture, you will have to do it privately.

However, I would recommend that you try a Mediterranean-style diet rich in oily fish, nuts, seeds, legumes, vegetables, fruits and some dairy products, as this will give you most of the vitamins and minerals you need. .

And now, when it’s spring, embrace the sun. To increase vitamin D levels, you should go out (for about 15 minutes) with your forearms, arms or lower legs uncovered and without sunscreen, ideally between 11:00 and 15:00.

But as the NHS warns, “Be careful not to get sunburned, so be careful to cover or protect your skin with sunscreen before your skin starts to turn red.”

One of the reasons for our success as a species is not just our big brains, but we are great at sweating.

We have ten times more sweat glands per inch than chimpanzees, and it is this mutation that helps cool down that allowed our ancestors to begin world domination by coming out of the woods to hunt in the hot African savannah.

The disadvantage is body odor (or BO). And now the real solution may come from eliminating the main villains, which include the bacterium Staphylococcus hominis.

In March, Belgian scientist Dr. Chris Kaleuert, known as “Dr. Armpit,” revealed promising results for a probiotic spray containing good microbes that displaces bad ones like Staphylococcus hominis. So is saying goodbye to BO forever?

After the triumph of Covid jab, it’s time to deal with mosquitoes!

Spring means barbecues, long outdoor evenings and mozzarella.

Globally, mosquitoes are not just annoying, but they are our deadliest predator. The diseases they transmit, including malaria, yellow fever and dengue fever, are the leading killers in human history.

Last week, however, news came that the vaccine, developed by the Oxford team responsible for piercing AstraZeneca Covid, had been shown in a small study to be 77% effective in preventing malaria.

This is a potentially huge breakthrough, and the world is awaiting the results of a greater test of interest.

Fortunately, we no longer have malaria in this country (the last outbreak was in 1917), but we do have many annoying insects. To protect yourself, avoid letting the water stay in plant pots or carts, as this is a potential breeding ground for mosquitoes.

Growing strong-smelling herbs such as lavender, basil and mint is said to keep them away, but I have not seen studies confirm this.

Nothing can exceed the mosquito repellent that DEET contains, although covering by wearing socks, pants and long sleeves is effective. I recently did an experiment with another brave volunteer, in which we both entered a room full of insatiable mosquitoes, dressed only in shorts and a T-shirt. We then counted our bites and found that they were mostly around the legs and ankles – probably because mosquitoes like the smell.

We also noticed insects that preferred to bite me. So another tip is to hang out with friends who are more attractive to mosquitoes. Relentless but effective.


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