Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ US https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Hawley was in a room “without anyone talking” during the Capitol riots: WSJ

Hawley was in a room “without anyone talking” during the Capitol riots: WSJ



  • When far-right rebels violated the Capitol during Wednesday’s Election College certification, many lawmakers were pushed into a safe room to escape the chaos.
  • One of those lawmakers was Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri, the leader of the Senate’s challenge to the victory of President-elect Joe Biden, who was shunned by his colleagues during the incredibly volatile situation, according to The Wall Street Journal.
  • “It was extremely striking,” one recalls of the magazine. “Most of the time he was alone in the corner of the room, with no one talking to him or admitting it.”
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When far-right rebels broke through the Capitol during Wednesday’s usual Election College certification, many lawmakers were ushered into a safe room to escape the chaos that pervaded its halls.

One of those lawmakers was Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri, the leader of the Senate’s challenge to the victory of President-elect Joe Biden, who was shunned by his colleagues during the incredibly volatile situation, according to The Wall Street Journal.

“It was extremely striking,” a man told the magazine. “Most of the time he was alone in the corner of the room, with no one talking to him or admitting it.”

According to Republican aides, Holly’s allies in the CSO Senate “were furious with him.”

Read more: President-elect Biden has expressed confidence that his inauguration will be safe. Hours later, Twitter warned that there was talk of another Capitol attack on January 17.

While a number of Democratic lawmakers thwarted his efforts to challenge Biden’s victory shortly after he announced his intentions in late December, the repulse after the riots is likely to jeopardize his effectiveness in the House ahead, especially with growing calls for him to resign.

Hawley, who was elected in 2018 by removing two terms from Democratic Senator Claire McCaskill, who was considered a likely presidential candidate in 2024, was the first senator to voice his objections to the results of the presidential election in 2020

Many saw Hawley’s move as part of a calculated strategy to bind to President Donald Trump’s supporters, and after he signed, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, who also looks into the White House, jumped in and led several other senators to join. efforts.

A law to formally object to the results of the Electoral College requires at least one member of the Chamber and a member of the Senate to allow for debate and voting on the preservation or invalidation of the election results of an individual state.

“In the protected room on Wednesday, the GOP leadership soon set in motion to persuade the 13 Republicans who oppose the Senate to reject any other objections to ratification,” the magazine said.

Cruz then convened with Hawley and several other Senate opponents to come up with a resolution, but Hawley was the only senator to continue. Hawley did not insist on further debate in the Senate, but his challenge to the Pennsylvania election results allowed objectors in Parliament’s parliament to continue discussing the results in the early hours of Thursday morning.

Biden’s 306-232 Election College victory over Trump was then certified, but the backlash against Hawley continued.

Former Republican Sen. John Danforth of Missouri, one of Holly’s biggest defenders in the Senate nomination, said Thursday that he deeply regrets the decision.

“Josh’s support and efforts to get him elected to the Senate were the worst mistake I’ve ever made in my life,” Danforth told Tony Messinger of St. Louis. “Yesterday was the physical culmination of a long attempt (by Hawley and others) to undermine the lack of public confidence in our democratic system. It is very dangerous for America to continue to push this idea that the government is not working and that the vote was fraudulent.”

On Thursday, Simon and Schuster announced that they were releasing Hawley’s upcoming book, The Tyranny of Great Technology, due in June 2021.

Despite growing isolation from colleagues on both sides of the aisle, Hawley said he would not resign.

“I will never apologize for giving my voice to the millions of Missourians and Americans who have concerns about the integrity of our election,” he said in a statement. “This is my job and I will continue to do it.”


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