Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ World https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ In a remote Arctic post, Norway oversees Russia's military construction: NPR

In a remote Arctic post, Norway oversees Russia's military construction: NPR



Norwegian Pvt. Ivan Sjoetun sits at the border post, where Russian land can be seen through the window. The post is located in the northeast corner of Norway and offers stunning views of this extremely beautiful area about 250 miles above the Arctic Circle.

Claire Harbage / NPR


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Claire Harbage / NPR

Norwegian Pvt. Ivan Sjoetun sits at the border post, where Russian land can be seen through the window. The post is located in the northeast corner of Norway and offers captivating views of this extremely beautiful area about 250 miles above the Arctic Circle.

Claire Herb / NPR

There are exactly 525 stairs from the icy waters of the Barents Sea to the top of the observation post in the far northeast corner of Norway, along the Russian border. It's a steep climb, but once you get to the top, there's a good chance that one of the young Norwegian recruiters will fill the outpost with a waffle plate – topped with strawberry jam and sour cream, a Norwegian favorite – to wait.

These waffles were made by 19-year-old Sander Bader in the observation post, where he and other individuals remain while observing Russian border activities.

Claire Harbage / NPR


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Claire Harbage / NPR

These waffles were made by Sander Bader, 19, at the observation post, where he and other individuals remain while observing Russian border activities.

Claire Herb / NPR

The border post, OP 247, offers a commanding view of this extremely beautiful terrain about 250 miles above the Arctic Circle. To the east, on the other side of the border, is a Russian observation post and a coastguard. Directly across the Barents Sea is the small Norwegian island of Vardo, which houses a US-funded military radar surveillance system.

"Apparently very annoying to the Russians," says Capt. Sigurd Harsheim, commander of the Jarfjord Border Company, as the radar installation helps monitor Russian movements in the Far North. "Generally, you have good control over the entire Barents Sea and everything around it … and I think part of the annoyance is that it was built in an American way.