Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Health https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Iowa will not immediately offer photos to all seniors

Iowa will not immediately offer photos to all seniors



Iowa does not plan to immediately offer coronavirus vaccinations to anyone over the age of 65, as recommended by the federal government on Tuesday, the Iowa Department of Public Health said.

“Once we have reasonable assurance that the supplies meet the requirements of these broader eligibility criteria, we will activate the broader distribution criteria,” the agency said in a news release Tuesday afternoon. “From the very beginning (of) this effort to spread, our goal is to reach all Iowans.”

;

The Iowa vaccination program, which launched in mid-December, focuses on health workers and residents and long-term care workers so far.

The department announced on Tuesday that the next round of vaccinations, which is expected to begin by February 1, should include Iowans 75 or more. Other eligible groups should include:

  • School and day staff.

  • Police and firefighters.

  • Prison and prison staff and prisoners.

  • People with disabilities and their carers.

  • People living in a municipality that are not yet covered.

  • Workers in a meat processing plant.

These groups were recommended for inclusion on Monday by a group of experts advising Kelly Garcia, interim director of the health department. Garcia decided to add health inspectors and government officials to the Iowa Capitol during the legislative session.

Federal Officer: Everyone over the age of 65 should be eligible

Earlier on Tuesday, the country’s chief health administrator announced a major change in federal recommendations for coronavirus vaccinations. US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Hazard has called on states to open vaccinations to anyone aged 65 or over. Hazard also said states should not withhold vaccines to ensure people get a second shot three or four weeks later. He said the production and shipment of vaccines should be able to provide follow-up photos.

“The US administration was too tightly focused,” Hazard said.

The Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday that 98,691 people received at least one of the two-dose coronavirus vaccinations, and 208,875 doses of the vaccines were delivered to the state.

Speaking to Iowa lawmakers on Tuesday, Garcia said Hazard’s department plans to dramatically speed up the delivery of vaccines to the United States. She said that as supplies increase, we will “quickly target” other groups, including people aged 65-75 and younger people with chronic health problems.

The health department said information would soon be available on how the vaccines would be distributed to the wider groups. Hundreds of local pharmacies and clinics could enter, and some employers could stage shots at their workplaces. Public health officials said county health departments could also set up central vaccination centers.

Iowa Official: Vaccines will take months to spread

Ken Sharpe, a state health department administrator monitoring the effort, told lawmakers on Tuesday that although the second round of vaccinations is set to begin on February 1, it could take weeks to deal with the country’s hundreds of thousands will qualify for the vaccine.

“Everyone needs to understand: Not everyone will get the vaccine on February 2,” he said. “They won’t even necessarily get their vaccine until February 15th or the end of February.

Sharpe said the rate of vaccination would depend heavily on supply, which is coordinated by the federal government.

“Our message continues to be: Please be patient,” he said. “… It’s not as easy as a light switch.”

Many counties, including the Regiment, have already expanded their vaccination efforts to include some people working in health-related areas, such as ambulance crews, home health workers and pharmacy staff.

In addition, the Iowa Department of Humanitarian Services has begun vaccinating staff at its six institutions, which include psychiatric hospitals in Cherokee and Independence, as well as the Resource Centers for People with Intellectual Disabilities in Glenwood and Woodward.

Polk County official: “The excitement after the holidays is on

Vaccinations come as Iowa and the nation continue to face deadly coronavirus outbreaks. By Tuesday morning, the state had registered 4,222 confirmed deaths from COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus. Although hospitalizations fell by more than half since the November outbreak, 552 residents were hospitalized on Tuesday with COVID-19.

Polk County warned on Tuesday that even with the spread of vaccines, coronavirus infections are on an alarmingly growing trend.

New positive tests kept falling after the wave in November, but they are rising again in the new year, experts said at a public online meeting on Tuesday. Polk County Health Director Helen Eddie warned that the trend means that Iowa’s most populous county could return to COVID-19 peaks by the end of January.

“The excitement after the holidays is underway,” Eddie said. “… We tend to reach the peak of the previous jump in November in the next 14 days, regardless of the progress of the vaccine. Strong stress on our health, schools and community is upon us. “

Public health officials continue to advise the public to avoid large groups, wear masks when in public and wash their hands frequently. These measures will be needed for months to come, they say.

Tony Lace covers health care for the Registry. Contact him at tleys@registermedia.com or 515-284-8449.

Iowa does not plan to immediately offer coronavirus vaccinations to anyone over the age of 65, as recommended by the federal government on Tuesday, the Iowa Department of Public Health said.

“Once we have reasonable assurance that the supplies meet the requirements of these broader eligibility criteria, we will activate the broader distribution criteria,” the agency said in a news release Tuesday afternoon. “From the very beginning (of) this effort to spread, our goal is to reach all Iowans.”

The Iowa vaccination program, which launched in mid-December, focuses on health workers and residents and long-term care workers so far.

The department announced on Tuesday that the next round of vaccinations, expected to begin by Feb. 1, should include Iowans 75 or older. Other eligible groups should include:

  • School and day staff.

  • Police and firefighters.

  • Prison and prison staff and prisoners.

  • People with disabilities and their carers.

  • People living in a municipality that are not yet covered.

  • Workers in a meat processing plant.


Source link