Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Entertainment https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ John Fogerty calls Trump a “happy son” and says it’s “confusing” that his Vietnam War song was released at the president’s rally

John Fogerty calls Trump a “happy son” and says it’s “confusing” that his Vietnam War song was released at the president’s rally





John Fogerty, Donald Trump pose for a photo: John Fogerty, who wrote


© Getty Images / Getty Images for Capitol Concerts; MANDEL NGAN / AFP via Getty Images
John Fogerty, who wrote The Happy Son, responded in a video to President Trump̵

7;s use of the song at a recent rally. Getty Images / Getty Images for Capitol Concerts; MANDEL NGAN / AFP via Getty Images

  • On Thursday, President Trump arrived for a pre-election rally in Freeland, Michigan, departing from Air Force One for the 1969 song “Fortunete Son” by Creedence Clearwater Revival.
  • John Fogerty, the musician who wrote the song, responded to Trump’s use of his song via a Facebook video on Friday.
  • “This is a song I could write now, so it seems confusing to me, I would say that the president has chosen to use my song for his political rallies, and in fact it seems that he is probably the happy son,” Fogerti said.
  • Other musicians – such as Neil Young and the family of the late Tom Petty – have criticized the use of their music at Trump-sponsored events.
  • Visit the Insider homepage for more stories.

On Thursday, President Donald Trump led a campaign rally in Freeland, Michigan, and left Air Force One for the 1969 song “Fortunete Son” by Creedence Clearwater Revival.

The song targets wealthy and influential families who managed to get their sons out of the Vietnam War project.

John Fogerty, a rock musician who was a member of Creedence Clearwater Revival and wrote “Fortunete Son,” shared a video on Facebook on Friday about the use of the song from Trump’s campaign.

“Recently, the president has been using my song ‘Happy Son’ for his political rallies, which I find at least confusing,” Fogarty said in the video.

In his video, Fogerty also sheds light on the meaning behind the lyrics, which include:

“Some people are born with a silver spoon in their hand / Lord, they don’t help themselves, no” and “It’s not me, it’s not me / I’m not the son of a millionaire.”

“I wrote the song in 1969 at the height of the Vietnam War,” Fogerty said. “By the time I wrote the song, I was already composed and had served in the military. And I’ve been a lifelong supporter of our boys and girls in the military, probably because of that experience, of course.”

Fogerty went on to say in his video: “In those days we still had a project and something that upset me a lot was the fact that people with privileges, in other words, rich people or people in positions of power, could use that to to avoid military service and not be accepted into the army. I found it very upsetting that such a thing could happen, so I wrote Happy Son. “



John Fogerty on guitar: John Fogerty performs for the 40th anniversary of PBS's


© Getty Images / Getty Images for Capitol Concerts
John Fogerty performs for the 40th anniversary of PBS’s “A Capitol Fourth” on July 4, 2020 in Washington. Getty Images / Getty Images for Capitol Concerts

He then noted the opening verses of the song: “Some people are born designed to wave the flag / Ooo, their red, white and blue / And when the band plays ‘Hello to the boss’ / Oo, they point the cannon at you. “

In her video, Fogerty compares the opening lines of “Happy Son” to Trump, using federal troops to remove protesters from a demonstration in Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C., so he can stand in front of St. John’s Church and hold a bible. for photo opportunity.

“This is a song I could write now, so I find it confusing, I would say that the president has chosen to use my song for his political rallies, but in fact it seems that he is probably the happy son,” Fogerty said. finishing the video.

Other musicians have responded or criticized the use of their songs in Trump’s campaigns

In June, the family of the late rock musician Tom Petty condemned the apparent use of his iconic song “I Won’t Back Back” at Trump’s campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Petty’s family tweeted that they had issued an order to end Trump’s campaign.

In July, singer Neil Young tweeted that “it’s not good” as his music was played at Trump’s Independence Day event in Mount Rushmore. Young’s songs “Rockin ‘in the Free World” and “Like a Hurricane” apparently sounded at the president’s event.

Since his first presidential campaign, Trump has prompted a number of other musicians to challenge their songs performed at his events, or issued statements urging Trump’s campaign not to use their music.

Read the original Insider article

Gallery: Musicians who banned presidential candidates from using their songs (Entertainment Weekly)

Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: They will not back down.




Source link