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NASA extends Mars and Jupiter missions, citing remarkable success



Referring to discoveries that have given rise to “exceptional science,” NASA has decided to add a few years to two of its planetary scientific missions: the Jupiter Juno mission and the Mars InSight landing.

After a lengthy review process, which can be found here, the space agency concluded that both missions “have broadened our understanding of our solar system and raised new sets of different issues.”

“The Senior Review confirmed that these two planetary science missions are likely to continue to bring new discoveries and raise new questions about our solar system,” Lori Glaze, director of the planetary science division, said in a statement.

“I thank the members of the Senior Review Panel for their comprehensive analysis, and I also thank the mission teams, who will now continue to provide exciting opportunities to improve our understanding of the dynamic science of Jupiter and Mars.”

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Civilian scientist Kevin M. Gill created this image using data from the spacecraft's JunoCam scanner.  (Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech)

Civilian scientist Kevin M. Gill created this image using data from the spacecraft’s JunoCam scanner. (Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech)

“CREATIONS” IN THE CLOUDS OF JUPITER? NASA’S JUNO SPACE CAPTURES IMAGES THAT CLAIM THE INTERNET

Juno has made a number of discoveries about Jupiter, including capturing remarkable, unprecedented images, as well as a “snow-white” oval storm.

The Juno mission was launched in 2011 and was due to cease operations in July 2021, but will now continue until September 2025 or for the rest of its life, whichever comes first. Not only will Juno continue to observe the gas giant, but it will also examine the rings of the planet and its moons, including the “close flights” of Ganymede, Europe and Io.

Europe, the sixth largest moon in the solar system, is home to an ocean that “could be habitable,” researchers said earlier. In August 2019, NASA confirmed that it would send a mission to Europe to further study the celestial body.

Priced at $ 828 million, the InSight lander became the first space agency probe to reach the Red Planet in six years since the Curverity Rover landed in August 2012.

NASA HAS A “WING” PROBLEM ON MARS

This illustration shows NASA's InSight spacecraft with its instruments located on the surface of Mars.  (Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech)

This illustration shows NASA’s InSight spacecraft with its instruments located on the surface of Mars. (Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech)

The mission of the InSight lander will be extended at least until December 2022. It will continue its work on collecting seismic and meteorological data, as well as conducting research using its thermal probe.

The InSight mission, which is run by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has provided scientists with a wealth of stunning images and discoveries since landing safely on the Red Planet in November 2018. “Seven minutes of terror. “

The landing was originally scheduled to explode in March 2016, but NASA halted preparations for the launch when a vacuum leak was detected in the vessel’s main scientific instrument.

In April 2019, the ship InSight registered the first of its kind “earthquake on Mars”.

In September 2019, the InSight lander detected strange bursts of magnetic pulses on Mars that raised “interesting questions.”

NASA’s long-term goal is to send a manned mission to Mars in the 2030s.

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