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New York City Restaurants Opening in Miami Due to Less COVID-19 Restrictions



Famous restaurants in New York, which opened in Miami despite the COVID-19 pandemic, are taking advantage of smaller restrictions, with the so-called business booming and overflowing with patrons and reservations.

While the once thriving hospitality scene in New York has been largely crippled by the state’s stringent COVID-19 measures, some restaurant owners say Miami has opened up new opportunities for expansion and survival amid the pandemic.

NYC Kissaki’s high-end sushi chain is among the newest to open in Miami, with restaurateur and owner Gary Kafner preparing to open two new locations this year.

Celebrity favorites such as Carbone, Cote and Sant Ambroeus have already set up shop in Miami. The popular Brooklyn pizzeria Roberta̵

7;s and Harlem Hot Root Red Rooster also recently opened.

These restaurants are not short of Carbone customers, in particular, they already see a quarterly waiting list after opening only last month.

The Michelin-starred Korean steakhouse Cote is almost impossible to get a reservation, and those who do are limited to 60 minutes to get people to move and get out.

Famous restaurants in New York, which opened in Miami despite the COVID-19 pandemic, are taking advantage of smaller restrictions, with the so-called business booming.  In particular, Carbone already has a quarterly waiting list, having only opened last month

Famous restaurants in New York, which opened in Miami despite the COVID-19 pandemic, are taking advantage of smaller restrictions, with the so-called business booming. In particular, Carbone already has a quarterly waiting list, having only opened last month

Felix Bendersky, owner of F + B Hospitality Leasing, told DailyMail.com that the business is “thriving” in Miami and that restaurants continue to flee New York.

“There are, I would probably say, about 150 groups in the last 60 days who have approached us looking for a place to eat,” he said.

Felix Benderski (above), owner of F + B Hospitality Leasing, told DailyMail.com that business is thriving in Miami and that restaurants continue to flee New York.

Felix Benderski (above), owner of F + B Hospitality Leasing, told DailyMail.com that business is thriving in Miami and that restaurants continue to flee New York.

“Some who have abandoned their projects in New York to come here. They believe that when New York returns, they will be able to go further in Miami.

“I think it was kind of crazy.”

Bender said tougher restrictions on the hotel industry in New York are increasing demand in Miami.

“Unfortunately, the mayor and governor of New York were my best organizers and sent everyone on our way,” he said.

“After the first shutdown, they had some hope that it would not be long before things would recover. But after the second closure, it really destroyed many business owners.

“Knowing that Florida has no plans to stop … people are just pulling the trigger.”

In Miami, restaurants are allowed to operate at 100 percent capacity throughout the winter, as long as social distance is maintained.

Florida Gov. Rick Desantis lifted all restrictions on COVID-19 last September.

The Harlem Red Rooster hotspot (pictured above) was also recently opened in Miami

The Harlem Red Rooster hotspot (pictured above) was also recently opened in Miami

The Michelin-starred Korean steakhouse Cote is almost impossible to book, and those who do are limited to 60 minutes to get people to and from.

The Michelin-starred Korean steakhouse Cote is almost impossible to book, and those who do are limited to 60 minutes to get people to and from.

The Altamarea group behind Mare and Mai and Ai Fiori, rated by Michelin stars in Manhattan, opened their fifth Osteria Morini in Miami in early February

The Altamarea group behind Mare and Mai and Ai Fiori, rated by Michelin stars in Manhattan, opened their fifth Osteria Morini in Miami in early February

Under current restrictions in New York, dinner at the restaurant is allowed in the city with a capacity of 35 percent.

The industry only had to cope with the harsh winter at an outdoor dinner, after indoor eating was banned in October, when infections began to rise.

This means that dinner indoors in New York was essentially banned for most of 2020.

Gary Kafner, the owner of Kissaki in New York, now plans to open two new restaurants in Miami this year.

When the pandemic broke out and New York’s restaurant scene was crippled by restrictions, Kafner opened in Hampton and Connecticut.

“I think a lot of restaurants are really nervous about what happened,” he told DailyMail.com.

“I think COVID took a lot of people, but it also created a lot of opportunities. I’ve always tried to move to Miami, but I think COVID has accelerated that.

“It’s an exciting situation in Miami. I feel really good about growth. ‘

He is now focusing on Florida, given how many people have fled New York in favor of Miami amid the pandemic.

“Miami has always been a good place for restaurants. “I feel like now because a lot of the sectors are moving here … a lot of families are moving here … that gives a lot more opportunities for restaurateurs,” he said.

“Miami was a second home for many people, and now it’s becoming a main home.”

Among them is 28-year-old Carlin Sheare, a marketing consultant in New York who has lived in Miami since January.

Sheare said that although she still thinks New York is the greatest city, she made the move because most of the things that made it great aren’t available right now.

She said all her friends also moved to Florida during the pandemic.

“I recently signed an apartment lease here and I’m paying less than half my rent in New York. “My apartment here is probably twice as big,” she said.

“West Palm Beach and Palm Beach are the feel of this small town, but you have a lot in common with New York, like these types of restaurants and bars and people.”

Celebrity favorites like Carbone, Cote and Sant Ambroeus have already set up shop in Miami

Celebrity favorites like Carbone, Cote and Sant Ambroeus have already set up shop in Miami

Gary Kafner (above), owner of Kissaki in New York, now plans to open two new restaurants in Miami this year.  It focuses on Florida, given how many people have fled New York in favor of Miami amid the pandemic

Gary Kafner (above), owner of Kissaki in New York, now plans to open two new restaurants in Miami this year. It focuses on Florida, given how many people have fled New York in favor of Miami amid the pandemic

Among those moving to Miami is 28-year-old Carlin Sheare, a marketing consultant in New York who has lived in Florida since January.  Sheare said that although she still believes New York is the greatest city, she made the move because much of the things that made it great are not currently available.

Among those moving to Miami is 28-year-old Carlin Sheare, a marketing consultant in New York who has lived in Florida since January. Sheare said that although she still believes New York is the greatest city, she made the move because much of the things that made it great are not currently available.

New cases of coronavirus in Florida continue to decline after reaching record highs during the holiday wave.

Hospitalizations and deaths have also been declining since the beginning of the year.

The state has now fully vaccinated nearly 9 percent of its population.

Cases, deaths and hospitalizations are also falling sharply in New York, where about 8% of the population is fully vaccinated.

This is because a study published last month by the New York Hospitality Alliance shows that the number of restaurants, bars, nightclubs and venues in New York that could not pay their rent has increased since the beginning. of the pandemic.

It peaked at 92 percent in December.

The survey found that 45.2% of the companies they surveyed did not pay rent in December, and 46.4% paid only some. Only 8.4 percent paid their entire rent.

Of those who managed to pay part of their rent, almost 50 percent paid half of their rent.

Among the 39.7% of businesses for which landlords gave up rent during the pandemic, 41.4% had to pay half of their rent.

Another 41.5% had a waiver for less than half of the rent and only 17.2% for more than half of the rent.

In the survey, 24.3 percent revealed that they have not renegotiated their lease with the landlord, but are in good faith.

New coronavirus cases in Florida continue to decline after reaching record highs during the holiday wave

New coronavirus cases in Florida continue to decline after reaching record highs during the holiday wave

Cases, deaths and hospitalizations are also falling sharply in New York, where about 8% of the population is fully vaccinated.

Cases, deaths and hospitalizations are also falling sharply in New York, where about 8% of the population is fully vaccinated.

A study published last month by the New York Hospitality Alliance shows that the number of restaurants, bars, nightclubs and venues in New York that could not pay their rent has increased since the beginning of the pandemic.

A study published last month by the New York Hospitality Alliance shows that the number of restaurants, bars, nightclubs and venues in New York that could not pay their rent has increased since the beginning of the pandemic.


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