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Osterholm: “We have a really difficult road ahead of us”



  • Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, warned of a potential spike in new coronavirus cases this fall and said the United States had “another 12 to 14 months on a really difficult road ahead.” “
  • Osterholm, who commented on NBC News’s “Meet The Press” on Sunday, said that while the vaccine against COVID-19 may appear, it will not have a “significant” impact until 2021 at the earliest.
  • Last week, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the best infectious disease expert in the United States, said Americans should expect to “bend”
    ; in the coming fall and winter months.
  • What is our national plan? Osterholm asked. “We don’t have one.”
  • Visit the Business Insider homepage for more stories.

Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, warned on Sunday of a potential jump in COVID-19 and a bleak future in the United States, citing a lack of a national plan to prevent further virus spread.

Osterholm made the comments when asked by Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd to explain previous remarks by Dr. Anthony Fauci, who said people in the United States should expect to “lean” in the coming fall and winter months.

“It won’t be easy,” Fauzi, longtime director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said last week during a panel discussion with Harvard Medical School. “We know that every time we remove restrictions, we get a breakthrough. It’s a terrible prayer.”

“I think we will probably get a vaccine by the end of the year, the beginning of 2021,” Fauci continued. “And I think that will be the thing that will turn it around. I just think we need to stoop.”

Osterholm said he and Fautsi were “on the same page”, citing about 40,000 new cases of the new coronavirus that are diagnosed every day. According to a Sunday report from Johns Hopkins University, there have been at least 6,492,744 cases of the new coronavirus in the United States so far, killing more than 190.00.

“We will open colleges and universities with the spillover that happens to people experiencing even more pandemic fatigue who want to be indoors with other people,” he said. “With our entry in the fall, we will see that these numbers will increase significantly,” he said.

Although Osterholm said a vaccine could be issued, it would not matter in a “meaningful” way, he added, until early next year. A recent survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that 62 percent of adults in the United States worried that “political pressure from the Trump administration” could prompt the Food and Drug Administration to approve a vaccine “without making sure it is safe and effective. “

“And then,” Osterholm said, “it will take us months to vaccinate the population of this country.”

“We really have another really hard time ahead of another 12 to 14 months,” Osterholm continued. “That’s what’s bothering me today. I’m not coming back and I’m not replaying February and March. I’m playing right now.

Osterholm’s comments come days after it was revealed that President Donald Trump told reporter Bob Woodward in a February interview that he knew the new coronavirus was more deadly than the worst flu viruses, although he continued to downplay the risks. from the virus in the months that followed.

“What is our national plan? We don’t have one,” he continued. “We have 50 state plans, which in many cases are so different, so divided and not necessarily based on good science. So, yes, we have a long way to go.”

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