Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Science https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Roads produce 84 PER CENT of plastic dust in the atmosphere

Roads produce 84 PER CENT of plastic dust in the atmosphere



Roads and the vehicles that use them are responsible for 84% of the microplastics found in the atmosphere, according to a new study.

Researchers at Utah State University have studied various sources of atmospheric microplastic pollution found in the western United States over a period of 14 months.

These microscopic pieces of plastic contamination are so widespread that they affect plant growth, transport to the air we breathe, infiltrate the oceans, be found in the intestines of insects in Antarctica and even in human blood, the study authors warned.

The US team found that 84% of the microplastics in the atmosphere came from road dust, mainly tires, 1

1% from sea spray and five percent from agricultural soil.

The study's authors found that most atmospheric microplastics come from roads, and marine spray (as bottles and packaging break down) comes second.

The authors of the study found that most atmospheric microplastics come from roads, and sea spray (as bottles and packaging disintegrate) comes second.

Researchers at Utah State University have studied various sources of atmospheric microplastic pollution found in the western United States over a period of 14 months.

Researchers at Utah State University have studied various sources of atmospheric microplastic pollution found in the western United States over a period of 14 months.

WHAT ARE MICROPLASTICS?

Microplastics are plastic particles smaller than five millimeters in size.

Tons of plastic waste are not recycled and treated properly.

They get into waterways, soil, oceans and even the atmosphere, decomposing over time from larger pieces of plastic waste.

They can also come from tire to tire while cars are driving on the roads, and micro beads used in laundry and fabrics.

Plastics do not degrade for thousands of years, instead forming smaller and smaller particles that enter the atmosphere and air conditioning system.

Scientists warn that microplastics are so small that they can penetrate organs.

It has been found that creatures of all shapes and sizes have consumed plastics, whether directly or indirectly.

Janice Brahni, Natalie Mahowald and colleagues studied the main sources of atmospheric microplastics, as well as the places where it is concentrated.

They found microplastics from the land on the surface of the ocean and plastic from the ocean on land – suggesting that it spreads through the atmosphere.

Hotspots for terrestrial microplastic sources and accumulation include Europe, East Asia, the Middle East, India and the United States, the study authors explain.

In general, the highest concentration of atmospheric microplastics is estimated above the ocean.

Depending on the size, the microplastics have remained in the atmosphere for approximately one hour to 6.5 days, the latter being long enough to be transported to another continent.

Even the most remote continent on Earth, Antarctica, has received microplastic pollution from the atmosphere, even though it has zero microplastic emissions.

The findings show that even after atmospheric microplastics settle on land or in water, they can re-enter the atmosphere.

Understanding how microplastics move through global systems is essential to solving the problem, Brahni said.

“Plastics enter the atmosphere … not directly from garbage cans or landfills, as you would expect … but from old, broken waste that penetrates large-scale atmospheric models,” the team explained.

Roads are a great source of atmospheric plastics, in which the car’s tires rotate and shoot small pieces into the sky through strong turbulence created by the car.

Ocean waves are also filled with insoluble plastic particles that used to be food packaging, soda bottles and plastic bags.

These “old plastic” particles rise to the top layer of water and are ejected by waves and wind and ejected into the air.

Sources of dust and agriculture for aerial plastic factors are more prominent in North Africa and Eurasia, while road-produced sources have a major impact in highly populated regions around the world.

These microscopic pieces of plastic contamination are so widespread that they affect plant growth, transport to the air we breathe, infiltration of the oceans, are found in the intestines of insects in Antarctica and even in human blood, the study authors warned.

These microscopic pieces of plastic contamination are so widespread that they affect plant growth, pass through the air we breathe, penetrate the oceans, are found in the intestines of insects in Antarctica and even in human blood, the study authors warned.

The US team found that 84% of the microplastics in the atmosphere came from road dust, mainly tires, 11% from sea spray and five percent from agricultural soil.

The US team found that 84% of microplastics in the atmosphere came from road dust, mainly tires, 11% from sea spray and five percent from agricultural soil.

This study is important, Brahni said, but it is only the beginning.

“Much more work is needed on this pressing issue to understand how different environments can affect the process – a wet climate versus dry, mountainous regions relative to plains,” she said.

“The world has not slowed down the production or use of plastics, so these issues are becoming more pressing every year.”

The findings are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

URBAN FLOWS FLOAT MICROPLASTIC IN THE OCEANS FASTER THAN THOUGHTS

Urban flooding is causing microplastics to be dumped into our oceans even faster than previously thought, according to scientists looking at pollution in rivers.

The waterways in Greater Manchester are now so heavily contaminated with microplastics that particles are found in every sample – even in the smallest streams.

This pollution is a major factor in ocean pollution, the researchers found as part of the first detailed study of the entire catchment around the world.

These debris – including micrograins and microfiber – are toxic to ecosystems.

Scientists tested 40 sites around Manchester and found that each waterway contained these small toxic particles.

Microplastics are very small pieces of plastic debris, including micrograins, microfibers and plastic fragments.

It has long been known that they enter river systems from many sources, including industrial wastewater, sewage rainwater and domestic wastewater.

However, although it is estimated that about 90% of microplastic pollution in the oceans originates from land, not much is known about their movement.

Most of the rivers studied had about 517,000 plastic particles per square meter, according to researchers at the University of Manchester, who conducted the detailed study.

After a period of great flooding, the researchers re-tested all sites.

They found that pollution levels had dropped in most of them and floods had removed about 70% of the microplastics stored in the riverbeds.

This shows that floods can transfer large amounts of microplastics from the city’s river to the oceans.


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