Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Sport https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Russell Westbrook passes Wilt Chamberlain with a second game 10-20-20; Oscar Robertson’s next triple-double brand

Russell Westbrook passes Wilt Chamberlain with a second game 10-20-20; Oscar Robertson’s next triple-double brand



Russell Westbrook’s triple double madness has become so routine – and largely so unrelated to a significant victory – that hardly anyone is paying attention. I’m guilty of that too. It’s a pity, really, because the figures Westbrook still presents are ridiculous.

On Monday night, Westbrook posted the 178th triple-double of his career, three behind Oscar Robertson’s 181 record in the NBA with 14 points, 21 rebounds and 24 assists. Yes, read these statistics correctly. This is only the third time in NBA history that someone has recorded a 10-20-20 game and Westbrook is responsible for two of them. Wilt Chamberlain scored the other with 22 points, 25 rebounds and 21

assists against Detroit in February 1968.

For StatMuse, Westbrook is also the only player in NBA history to have recorded many games with 20 rebounds and 20 assists in his career. Again, this happened three times, and Westbrook is responsible for two of them, with Wilt, in the same game mentioned above, being the other.

For the season, Westbrook has an average of 21.8 points, 11.3 rebounds and 11.2 assists. With seven games to play, he can’t fall below the triple-double average for the season, even if he records zeros from now on.

No matter how you cut it, it’s crazy. Oscar Robertson, averaging a triple-double for an entire season, was once something of a mythical trait. Now Westbrook has done so four times in the last five seasons. This is a testament to his talent, obviously. But the part we don’t talk about enough is his bike. You do not accumulate such public numbers every night, year after year, by withdrawing and letting the game or the ball come to you. Go get it. You live in an attack mode.

Westbrook can make a few unprofessional shots and make uncontrollable turns and save some energy here and there in defense, but for the most part he comes out completely every second when he’s on the court. And that approach seals his name in history to some of the most iconic figures to ever play in the NBA.




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