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Solar Eclipse “Ring of Fire”: How to watch



View of an annular solar eclipse from Tokyo, May 21, 2012 (Isay Kato / Reuters)

View of an annular solar eclipse from Tokyo, May 21, 2012 (Isay Kato / Reuters)

Skygazers in the Northern Hemisphere on Thursday will be treated with a “ring of fire”

; or ring-like eclipse, which occurs when the moon passes in front of the sun in line with Earth, creating the appearance of a ring of fire.

How much of the eclipse will be visible depends on where you are; most viewers will only see a partial version.

In the United States, the eclipse will occur before dawn for many, but those on the East Coast will be able to catch part of it just after sunrise. In New York, a partial eclipse will be visible at 5:32 p.m. ET.

The full “ring” will be visible in parts of northern Canada, Greenland and Russia, with a maximum eclipse visible in the North Pole region starting at 6:41 a.m. and lasting just under four minutes.

If you’re not lucky enough to be close to the North Pole, don’t worry: The eclipse will be broadcast live.

As with any eclipse, it is never safe to look directly at the sun’s rays, even if the sun is partially obscured. NASA recommends wearing “sunglasses or sunglasses throughout the eclipse.”

And while Thursday’s eclipse is the only annular eclipse in the 2021 calendar, there will be a total eclipse visible to parts of the Southern Hemisphere on December 4.

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