Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Science https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Space Station flies over Cincinnati Thursday, Friday: When to look up

Space Station flies over Cincinnati Thursday, Friday: When to look up



went well, he was. We have an ignition. We have ignition on and off. The European crew has already switched to Ah, a wide-angle view of the International Space Station of some force. When we opened the hedge of the vehicle, it was a prayer card boss, a hedge hole, a carrot juggling. I’m not exactly sure. No, that’s the hardest thing we’ve ever done. I think harder than going to the moon. And it really is proof of the fact that if we put our minds into something, if we listen to the experts, if we work together as a team, we can achieve some amazing things. The smooth movement of the car, everything where it seems to approach the shoulder, is the first piece of structure. Just call it the 20th anniversary. I̵

7;m incredibly excited to be there. I think this is really a testament to this space station that we have built, and these are people. Engineers and scientists from all over the world are part of this. It’s just an amazing engineering and scientific marvel

Space Station flies over Cincinnati Thursday, Friday: When to look up


Look at the sky, Cincinnati. The International Space Station will fly over the Cincinnati region this week. Thursday and Friday nights we have two stellar chances to see the largest, brightest and best satellite flying overhead, according to Dean Regas of the Cincinnati Observatory. Above the video: The space station marks 20 years of people living in orbit The ISS is 239 feet wide, 356 feet long, 66 feet high and weighs over 900,000 pounds. There is currently a crew of seven astronauts orbiting hundreds of miles above Earth. “From Earth, the ISS looks like a very bright, unblinking star moving slowly across the sky,” Regas said. “Clear skies are expected, starfish in the area will notice it.” So, what are the best times to see the ISS? According to Regas, look up facing southwest on Thursday night. The best viewing will be from 7:02 to 19:06. It will rise straight up, just to the right of Jupiter, Regas said. On Friday night, turn south between 6:15 and 6:21 p.m., Regas suggests. It will travel from right to left, past Jupiter, Saturn and the Moon.

Look at the sky, Cincinnati.

The International Space Station will fly over the Cincinnati region this week.

Thursday and Friday nights we have two stellar chances to see the largest, brightest and best satellite flying overhead, according to Dean Regas of the Cincinnati Observatory.

Above the video: The space station marks 20 years of people living in orbit

The ISS is 239 feet wide, 356 feet long, 66 feet high and weighs over 900,000 pounds. There is currently a crew of seven astronauts orbiting hundreds of miles above Earth.

“From Earth, the ISS looks like a very bright, unblinking star moving slowly across the sky,” Regas said. “Clear skies are expected, stargazers around the area will notice it.”

So what are the best times to view the ISS? According to Regas, look up facing southwest on Thursday night. Best viewing will be from 7:02 to 19:06

It will rise straight up, just to the right of Jupiter, Regas said.

On Friday night, turn south between 6:15 and 6:21 p.m., Regas suggests.

It will travel from right to left, past Jupiter, Saturn and the Moon.


Source link