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SpaceX Dragon Resilience astronaut shares mesmerizing video from Timelapse on the Milky Way



“I didn’t think the views could be improved!” The astronaut shares a mesmerizing Timelapse video of the Milky Way from the Crew Dragon Resilience spacecraft

  • Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi shot the timelapse video from space
  • He was in the SpaceX Crew Dragon Resilience capsule when he shot the video
  • The video was shared by NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, who was with Noguchi

A mesmerizing video of the weather, made from the window of the SpaceX Crew Dragon Resilience spacecraft, left NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins “blown away” by his beauty.

The video shows a field of black and blue stars moving through the frame and was shot by Japanese Aerospace Agency (JAXA) astronaut Soichi Noguchi.

“I didn’t think the views could improve, then my teammate [Soichi Noguchi] I took this night excerpt from Resilience and was blown away, ”Hopkins said.

Noguchi and Hopkins are among the ten astronauts currently aboard the International Space Station, orbiting the Earth about 250 miles above Earth.

The two shared a trip to the orbital laboratory with two other NASA astronauts as part of the Crew-1 mission operated by SpaceX in November 2020.

The video shows a field of black and blue stars moving through the frame and was shot by Japanese Aerospace Agency (JAXA) astronaut Soichi Noguchi.

The video shows a field of black and blue stars moving through the frame and was shot by Japanese Aerospace Agency (JAXA) astronaut Soichi Noguchi.

The four astronauts, including Noguchi and Hopkins, had to move their SpaceX Crew Dragon Resilience capsule to make room for incoming SpaceX missions.

The Crew-1 astronauts were the first to be taken to the ISS by a commercial operator and the first from US soil since the last space shuttle flight in 2011.

Noguchi, who made the sensational video of the stars moving outside the Crew Dragon spacecraft, traveled to the ISS three times.

His first was on the space shuttle, which retired in 2011, then he flew to the station with the Soyuz spacecraft operated by Roscosmos, and finally on his last trip became the first Japanese astronaut to fly a commercial spacecraft.

With another SpaceX Dragon crew scheduled to arrive on the ISS on April 22 and cargo flights upcoming over the next few weeks, the team had to vacate the docking port.

The stability was docked with the Harmony module, but had to be “re-parked” on April 5 – the first time for a commercial spacecraft docked with the ISS.

Hopkins, Victor Glover, and NASA’s Shannon Walker and Noguchi wore their flight suits to move the capsule in a process that took about 45 minutes.

The reason they had to be on the Crew Dragon was to ensure that if it failed to transfer, there would be no more people on the ISS than places on the ships to escape if there was a problem in the orbital laboratory.

Noguchi and Hopkins are among the ten astronauts currently aboard the International Space Station, about 250 miles above Earth.

Noguchi and Hopkins are among the ten astronauts currently aboard the International Space Station, about 250 miles above Earth.

The second spacecraft, the SpaceX Crew Dragon, will take NASA astronauts Shane Kimbro as a spaceship commander and Megan MacArthur as a pilot.

They will be joined by European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Peske and Akihiko Hoshide of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on April 22nd.

One week later, on April 28, the Crew-1 mission will end when Hopkins, Walker, Victor Glover and Soichi Noguchi splash around Florida.

The two shared a trip to the orbital laboratory with two other NASA astronauts as part of the Crew-1 mission operated by SpaceX in November 2020.

The two shared a trip to the orbital laboratory with two other NASA astronauts as part of the Crew-1 mission operated by SpaceX in November 2020.

Dragon Crew’s returning resilience will be repaired for the Inspiration4 Mission, which will take four private ISS citizens no earlier than mid-September.

During the last launch of the ISS, a NASA astronaut and two Russian astronauts exploded on a Soyuz rocket and boarded the station.

NASA’s Mark Vande Hay, Soyuz commander Oleg Novitsky and Roscosmos aeronautical engineer Piotr Dubrov made the trip on Monday.

EXPLAINED: THE 100 BILLION INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION SITS 250 MILLIONS ABOVE THE EARTH

The International Space Station (ISS) is a $ 100 billion (£ 80 billion) science and engineering laboratory orbiting 400 miles above Earth.

Since November 2000, it has been staffed by rotating crews of astronauts and astronauts.

Research conducted aboard the ISS often requires one or more of the unusual conditions in the Earth’s low orbit, such as low gravity or oxygen.

ISS studies have examined human research, space medicine, life sciences, physical sciences, astronomy and meteorology.

The US space agency Nasa spends about $ 3 billion (£ 2.4 billion) a year on the space station program, a level of funding approved by the administration and the Congress of Trump.

A commission of the US House of Representatives, which controls NASA, has begun considering whether to continue the program after 2024.

Alternatively, the money could be used to accelerate planned human space initiatives to the moon and Mars.

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