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State, local health orders end Tuesday when Utah reaches the COVID-19 “final game” pandemic



SALT LAKE CITY – Utah has reached the final game of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The state crossed the threshold in the three indicators outlined in Utah HB294, also known as the “final games” pandemic bill, on Tuesday afternoon, according to health officials.

This means that most state and local health orders will end on Tuesday. The bill requires most of these health orders to close on the day the 14-day Utah incidence rate is less than 191 per 100,000 people, with the average daily use of COVID-19 in the intensive care unit below 15%. and 1,633,000 primary doses of COVID-19 vaccine were provided to the state.

The Utah Department of Health announced Tuesday that the state has reached the benchmark in all three. The 1

4-day incidence rate in Utah is 163.4 per 100,000 people, the average use of the intensive care unit in the last week is 11.2%, and 1,656,025 basic doses of vaccines are distributed to the state, according to the health department.

“I understand that HB294 is controversial. Important, legitimate arguments have been put forward on all sides of the issue,” Health Executive Director Rich Saunders said in a letter to the Utah legislature on Tuesday. “But today must give us all a reason to celebrate. No matter which side someone comes from, we can all be proud of the results we have achieved so far.”

Although most health orders will be completed, the bill allows the health department’s orders for K-12 schools in Utah to continue. The mandate of the K-12 school masks will last until June 1 or the last school day, whichever comes first, according to the health department.

“It’s important that we don’t give up the land we’ve accumulated, especially in our schools,” Saunders said. “We ask teachers, administrators, parents and students to pray that they stay there and end the year healthily.”

New cases of COVID-19

The number of COVID-19 cases in Utah rose by 259 on Tuesday, with another 13 deaths and 19,965 vaccinations reported, according to the Utah Department of Health.

Ten of the deaths reported on Tuesday occurred before April 1st, but are still being investigated, according to the health department.

There are currently 8,158 active cases of COVID-19 in Utah, the health department said. The moving seven-day average number of positive cases per day is now 358, according to the health department. The positive test rate per day for this time period, calculated using the “people over people” method, is now 6.5%. The positive test rate per day for this time period, calculated using the “test over test” method, is now 3.4%.

Currently, 143 patients with COVID-19 are hospitalized in Utah, including 54 in intensive care, state data show. About 68 percent of Utah’s intensive care units have been occupied since Tuesday, including about 71 percent of the intensive care unit’s beds in the state’s 16 hospitals. About 49% of hospital beds outside the intensive care unit are already occupied in the state, the health department said.

A total of 2,204,824 doses of vaccine were administered in the state, compared with 2,184,859 on Monday. A total of 1,320,344 Utah states received at least the first dose of vaccine, and 973,629 were fully vaccinated. So far, 2,558,940 doses of vaccine have been sent to Utah.

About 41.2% of all Utahs have now received at least one dose of vaccine, and 30.4% have been fully vaccinated. Among Utah states that are 16 years of age or older and currently eligible for the vaccine, 55.5% have had at least one dose and 40.9% have been fully vaccinated, according to state data.

The new figures show a 0.07% increase in positive cases from Monday. Of the 2,574,992 people tested so far for COVID-19 in Utah, 15.5% tested positive for COVID-19. The number of general tests conducted in Utah since the start of the pandemic is now 4,678,269, up 10,114 from Monday. Of these, 4,059 were tests on people who had not previously been tested for COVID-19, according to the health department.

The 13 deaths reported on Tuesday were:

  • A boxing woman who was between the ages of 45 and 64 and was hospitalized when she died
  • A man from Cash County who was between 45 and 64 years old and was not hospitalized when he died
  • A woman from Cash County who was between the ages of 65 and 84 and was hospitalized when she died
  • A man from Carbon County who was between the ages of 25 and 44 and was not hospitalized when he died
  • A Salt Lake County man who was over 85 years old and was not hospitalized when he died
  • A man from Salt Lake County who was between the ages of 25 and 44 and was hospitalized when he died
  • A man from Salt Lake County who was between the ages of 45 and 64 and was not hospitalized when he died
  • Two Salt Lake County men between the ages of 65 and 84 who were not hospitalized when they died
  • A Salt Lake County woman between the ages of 25 and 44 who was not hospitalized when she died
  • A woman from Winta County who was between the ages of 25 and 44 and was hospitalized when she died
  • A Washington County man between the ages of 65 and 84 who was not hospitalized when he died
  • A Weber County man over the age of 85 who was hospitalized when he died

Aggregate data from Tuesday gave Utah a total of 398,499 confirmed cases, with a total of 16,258 hospitalizations and 2,217 disease deaths. Approximately 388,124 cases of COVID-19 in Utah are considered recovered.

Utah Gov. Spencer Cox’s weekly COVID-19 press conference is scheduled for 11 a.m. Thursday, according to his office.

Singer Alex Boye reunites with the victim of COVID-19

Also Thursday, singer Alex Boye reunited with a recovering victim of COVID-19, whom he sang to last year while she was hospitalized with the disease.

Anna Lucio was discharged from MountainStar Lakeview Hospital in Bountiful in May 2020 after spending more than two months in hospital with COVID-19. It was the longest hospital admission for COVID-19, according to a news release from MountainStar.

Boye’s concert in May 2020 in the hospital parking lot was the first time Lucio had been out since being admitted to the hospital.

“I remember feeling such strong emotions on the day of last year’s concert,” Lucio told the news through an interpreter. “I think it’s important to share hope with the world, especially in these times when many people can easily feel depressed or depressed. I’m so grateful to everyone who took care of me during my hospital stay.”

Singer Alex Boye, left and recovering COVID-19 victim Anna Lucio, right, shares five at MountainStar Lakeview Hospital in Generous on Tuesday, May 4, 2021. Boye gave a concert at the hospital in front of Lucio and frontline health workers at the start of the COVID pandemic. -19 the two gathered on Tuesday to mark the anniversary of Boyé's concert.
Singer Alex Boye, left and recovering COVID-19 victim Anna Lucio, right, shares five at MountainStar Lakeview Hospital in Generous on Tuesday, May 4, 2021. Boye gave a concert at the hospital in front of Lucio and frontline health workers at the start of the COVID pandemic. -19 the two gathered on Tuesday to mark the anniversary of Boyé’s concert. (Photo: Aubrey Shaffer, KSL TV)

Boye gave another concert for workers and patients at the hospital on Tuesday to mark the anniversary of his first show at the hospital.

“I just want to bring a little music, a little laughter, a little fun,” Boye said in an interview Tuesday. “I know how important this is in my life and I hope I can do it for other people. So I’m excited about it.”

Lucio is still recovering from the disease, but is now in about 80 percent health, the statement said.

In an interview Tuesday, Lucio said she saw Boye and his wife motivated to spread some hope at the start of the pandemic, so he came to sing at the hospital to spread some joy. She said she also wanted to be a message of hope.

Boye said he remembered seeing doctors and nurses last year whose faces were “raw and red” from the masks they wore.

“It just tells me a lot about how important it is and the hard work that doctors and nurses do, they probably work twice as hard,” he said.

Boye said he lost 170 performances during the pandemic since the events were canceled, but his managers have been overwhelmed with calls over the past two weeks.

As more people are vaccinated against COVID-19, spring has brought a sense of hope and a new beginning, the singer said.

“You can feel it in the air,” Boye said.

Contributes to: Paul Nelson, KSL NewsRadio; Aubrey Shaffer, KSL TV

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