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Sunlight inactivates SARS-CoV-2 on surfaces in a laboratory test, as the CDC says the virus does not spread easily in media



Sunlight appears to inactivate the device coronavirus which causes COVID-19, according to a study.

Scientists have found an imitation of sunlight “quickly inactivated” SARS-CoV-2 of stainless steel coupons in the laboratory. The results were published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Past studies have shown that SARS-CoV-2 can stay in the right conditions on non-porous internal surfaces for days, the authors explain in their document. A widely peer – reviewed study published in New England Journal of Medicine showed that the embryo can live up to three days on plastic and steel, compared to 24 hours on cardboard, four hours on copper and up to three hours as an aerosol.

However, in updated guidelines published earlier this month, which made headlines over the past day, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the virus is not thought to spread easily by touching surfaces or objects.

To find out if SARS-CoV-2 can survive in conditions similar to the outdoors, the team uses a device that simulates natural sunlight, including ultraviolet rays. They also controlled the temperature and humidity in a laboratory chamber. The virus is grown in both laboratory cultures and in a liquid resembling human saliva. The samples were then dried on stainless steel coupons.

Contaminated coupons were taped and attached to the chamber wall and exposed to light for various periods of time ranging from 2 to 1

8 minutes. Another set of coupons loaded with viruses were placed in the chamber for up to 60 minutes in the dark as a control.

Ultraviolet B (UVB) were detected rays that rapidly inactivate SARS-CoV-2, according to the team. In conditions resembling midday sunlight on the longest day of the year at 40 degrees north latitude, 90 percent of the virus is inactivated every 6.8 minutes in saliva.