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The discovery of the big stars of SpaceX raised more questions than answers




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© 201

9 Bloomberg Finance LP

In a small town in Texas over the weekend, Musk revealed the latest SpaceX mammoth the Starship project, which the company hopes will one day transport up to 100 people on a flight to Mars – and beyond – but while many praise the breathtaking visualization and ambition, key issues still remain in view of SpaceX's aggressive upcoming schedule.

is without a doubt one of the most exciting things that has happened in man's space flight in the last ten Measuring 50 meters high and made of stainless steel – which gives SpaceX huge cost savings on more traditional carbon fibers – the vehicle is capable of lifting a mammoth of more than 100 tonnes, larger from every vehicle in history.

It will launch on its tip a large booster called the Super Heavy, 68 m in height. Both vehicles are designed o to be reusable, landing back on Earth and ready to fly again as soon as she notices. Super Heavy will be powered by 37 of the engines of Raptor Starship from six of them.

"This is the most inspiring thing I have seen," Musk said at the company's event in Boca Chica on Saturday, September 28, where Starship was presented to an excited audience. "It's really going to be epic to see this thing take off and come back."

The plan is for this prototype version of the final car, known as the Mark 1, to reach an altitude of 20 kilometers in the next month or two. Within six months, if the company adheres to its "exponential" development schedule, Musk says the Mark 3 version could reach orbit after six months in early 2020. And human launches may even follow the same year he says.

If that sounds ambitious, so be it. SpaceX has not yet released people, though NASA has concluded contracts for the significantly smaller and (perhaps unfairly) less impressive Crew Dragon vehicle. NASA Chief Jim Bridenstein announced his feelings about the delays of this vehicle, funded by the NASA Merchant Team Program, on Twitter last week.

"I look forward to SpaceX's announcement tomorrow," Bridenstein said on Friday, September 27. "Commercial Crew, meanwhile, has been lagging for years. NASA's schedule expects the same level of enthusiasm focused on US taxpayer investment. It's time to deliver."

SpaceX releases people next year to Starship seems almost unthinkable, though the company has proven many doubts wrong before. But many key questions remain for Starship's vehicle, questions that Musk has diverted or failed to provide adequate answers to.

© 2019 Bloomberg Finance LP [19659003] One of them is the issue of safety. With respect to vehicle life support systems, Musk has given up on its concerns, saying that they will be "not super-hard" to develop compared to the actual construction of the vehicle. Others, however, note that it is a dangerous approach to take to an extremely risky business.

Another is what will actually be inside the vehicle itself. While this Mark 1 vehicle is just an early prototype, customers like Yusaku Maezawa a Japanese billionaire who bought a ticket on a Starship flight around the moon, may be wondering what they will actually be riding if or when Starship ends up started.

There is an awkward question about the interruption of the launch, something that the space shuttle lacked to the detriment of seven astronauts in the 1986 Challenger crash. or during orbit launch. Just last year, such a system saved the lives of two astronauts aboard the Soyuz spacecraft. One assumes that SpaceX can never recover from a disaster with people on board.

And there are much broader questions regarding SpaceX's purpose of sending people to other worlds. How will these people live? What would be the price? What happens if SpaceX goes bankrupt? These are probably things to look at in the future, but it doesn't seem unreasonable to look for answers & nbsp; now.

SpaceX, of course, should be commended for the incredible progress they have made, not just with Starship – which began construction only earlier this year – but the Falcon and Dragon fleet. However, & nbsp; it is important & nbsp; look beyond the hype and ask some critical questions about what is the most ambitious human space flight project in history.

"I really think things will go really fast," Musk said during the Boca Chica event. And we could hope that many of the worries about Starship, no matter how easy it seems to be resolved, are taken seriously.

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© 2019 Bloomberg Finance LP

In a small town in Texas over the weekend, Musk revealed the latest SpaceX mammoth project – Starship, which the company hopes to one day carry up to 100 people on a flight to and from Mars – but while many praise the breathtaking visuals and ambitions, key issues still remain in line with SpaceX's aggressive upcoming schedule.

Starship is without a doubt one of the most exciting things that have happened in human space flight over the last ten Measuring 50 meters high and made of stainless steel, SpaceX offers enormous cost savings over more traditional carbon fiber – the car has a mammoth lift capacity of more than 100 tons greater than any vehicle in history.

It will launch from above a large booster called the Super Heavy, itself measuring 68 meters in height. Both vehicles are designed for reusability, land back on Earth and ready to fly again as soon as they notice . Super Heavy will be powered by 37 of Raptor's Starship engines, six of them.

"This is the most inspiring thing I have seen," Musk said during a company event in Boca Chica on Saturday, September 28, where Starship was presented to an excited audience. "It's really going to be epic to see this thing take off and come back."

The plan is for this prototype version of the final car, known as the Mark 1, to reach an altitude of 20 kilometers in the next month or two. Within six months, if the company adheres to its "exponential" development schedule, Musk says the Mark 3 version could reach orbit after six months in early 2020. And human launches could follow the same year, he says he.

If that sounds ambitious, it is. SpaceX has not released people yet, although NASA has concluded contracts for the much smaller and (perhaps unfairly) less impressive Crew Dragon. NASA Chief Jim Bridenstein announced his feelings about the delays of this vehicle, funded by the NASA Merchant Team Program, on Twitter last week.

"I look forward to SpaceX's announcement tomorrow," Bridenstein said on Friday, September 27. "Commercial Crew, meanwhile, has been lagging for years. NASA's schedule expects the same level of enthusiasm focused on US taxpayer investment. It's time to deliver."

SpaceX releases people next year to Starship seems almost unthinkable, though the company has proven many doubts wrong before. But numerous key questions remain for Starship's vehicle, questions that Musk has diverted or failed to provide adequate answers to.

© 2019 Bloomberg Finance LP [19659031] One of them is the issue of safety. With respect to vehicle life support systems, Musk has given up on its concerns, saying that they will be "not super-hard" to develop compared to the actual construction of the vehicle. Others, however, note that it is a dangerous approach to take to an extremely risky business.

Another is what will actually be inside the vehicle itself. Although this Mark 1 vehicle is just an early prototype, customers like Yusaku Maezawa, a Japanese billionaire who bought a ticket on a Starship flight around the moon, may be wondering what they'll actually be riding if or eventually Starship [19659004] There is also the awkward question of interrupting the launch, something that the space shuttle lacked to the detriment of seven astronauts in the Challenger crash in 1986. In its current iteration, Starship does not appear to have a start-stop system in the event of a site crash or during launching at op ITA. Just last year, such a system saved the lives of two astronauts aboard the Soyuz spacecraft. One assumes that SpaceX can never recover from a disaster with people on board.

And there are much broader questions regarding SpaceX's purpose of sending people to other worlds. How will these people live? What would be the price? What happens if SpaceX goes bankrupt? These are probably things that will be addressed in the future, but it does not seem unreasonable to look for answers now.

SpaceX, of course, should be commended for the incredible progress they have made, not just with Starship – which began construction only earlier this year – but its fleet of Falcon and Dragon vehicles. However, it is important to look beyond the over-the-top and ask some critical questions about who is the most ambitious human space flight project in history.

"I really think things are going to go really fast," Musk said during the Boca Chica event. seriously.


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