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The first death related to the flu in the 2020 season in South Carolina, confirmed by DHEC



YOU RESTORE ONLY A FEW MINUTES. CHRIS THANKS AND THE NEWS NEWS FROM HEALTH STATES OF SOUTH CAROLINA REPORT THE FIRST STATE INFLUENZA-RELATED INFLUENZA SAYS, SAY. NO OTHER INFORMATION IS RELEASED DEBTORS SAY IT IS MORE IMPORTANT

The first death related to the flu in the 2020 season in South Carolina, confirmed by DHEC


The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control said Wednesday that the state suffered its first flu-related death this season. “Unfortunately, a person from the Pee Dee region has died from complications from the flu, our first confirmed flu – linked to the death of the season,” said Dr. Linda Bell, state epidemiologist and director of the Office of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control. “As we are currently in the midst of the worst public health crisis in 100 years, it has never been more important for each of us to stay as healthy as possible, and one key step we can take is to to get flu vaccines. “North Carolina health officials say the first flu-related death was on Oct. 16. No other flu-related deaths have been confirmed since, according to the state’s Ministry of Health and Social Services website. DHEC and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend these 6-month-olds and old r get vaccinated. Prevention of influenza is especially important for people who are at increased risk of complications from the virus, including young children, adults aged 50 and over, pregnant women and people with certain chronic diseases. the same time is possible and can probably cause more complications than if the flu is the only infection. The flu vaccine offered this year protects against the four most common different flu viruses that are expected to circulate this flu season. Influenza vaccines are safe, effective and do not cause the flu. Getting a flu vaccine reduces your chances of getting the flu and, if agreed, reduces hospitalizations and deaths from the flu. Those at high risk of serious flu complications include young children, pregnant women, people aged 65 and over and those with chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes, heart or lung disease. However, healthy people can also have serious complications from the flu. “Vaccination is one of the most successful public health interventions in history to reduce the spread of disease and prevent complications and deaths from vaccine-preventable diseases,” Bell said. “So many generations before us would give anything to have a flu vaccine. With the spread of COVID-19 in our country, we must have every opportunity we have like the vaccines that medical science has given us to prevent diseases like the flu. Includes the use of masks, physical distancing from good hygiene and avoiding group gatherings. These measures prevent both influenza and COVID-19 infections. “” Another reason why it’s important for you to get the flu this year is that we need to avoid overloading our hospitals, intensive care units and ventilators, as we can, for both flu patients and COVID-19 patients. The flu vaccine is available from many providers, including DHEC health departments, doctors’ offices, clinics, pharmacies, schools and workplaces. Influenza vaccines available at DHEC health department clinics are available on pre-order. Call 855-472-3432 to make an appointment or go to scdhec.gov/fluclinics to find the nearest location.For other vaccine providers, visit vaccinefinder.org/find-vaccine. You can find the flu at www.scdhec.gov/flu.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control said Wednesday that the state suffered its first flu-related death this season.

“Unfortunately, a man from the Pee Dee region has died from complications from the flu, our first confirmed flu-related death since the season,” said Dr Linda Bell, state epidemiologist and director of DHEC’s Preventive Diseases Prevention and Control. . “As we are currently in the midst of the worst public health crisis in 100 years, it has never been more important for each of us to stay as healthy as possible, and one key step we can take is to get vaccinated. against the flu. “

North Carolina health officials said the first flu-related death was on Oct. 16.

No other flu-related deaths have been confirmed since, according to the state Department of Health and Human Services’ website.

DHEC and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend vaccination at 6 months of age and older. Prevention of influenza is especially important for people who are at increased risk of complications from the virus, including young children, adults aged 50 and over, pregnant women and people with certain chronic diseases.

Negotiating influenza and COVID-19 at the same time is possible and is likely to cause more complications than if influenza is the only infection. The flu vaccine offered this year protects against the four most common different flu viruses that are expected to circulate this flu season. Influenza vaccines are safe, effective and do not cause the flu. Getting your flu vaccines reduces your chances of getting the flu and, if agreed, reduces hospitalizations and deaths from the flu.

Those at high risk for serious flu complications include young children, pregnant women, people 65 and older, and those with chronic illnesses such as asthma, diabetes, heart or lung disease. However, healthy people can also have serious complications from the flu.

“Vaccination is one of the most successful public health interventions in history to reduce the spread of disease and prevent complications and deaths from vaccine-preventable diseases,” Bell said. “So many generations before us would give anything to have a flu vaccine. With the spread of COVID-19 in our country, we must have every opportunity we have like the vaccines that medical science has given us to prevent diseases like the flu. Includes the use of masks, physical distancing from good hygiene and avoiding group gatherings. These measures prevent both influenza and COVID-19 infections. “

“Another reason why it’s important to get a flu shot this year is that we need to avoid overloading our hospitals, intensive care units and ventilators as best we can, both for flu patients and in patients with COVID-19, increasing, “said Bell.

The flu vaccine is available from many providers, including DHEC health departments, doctors’ offices, clinics, pharmacies, schools and workplaces.

Influenza vaccines available at DHEC health clinics are available upon prior request.

Call 855-472-3432 to make an appointment or go to scdhec.gov/fluclinics to find the nearest location. For other vaccine providers, visit vaccinefinder.org/find-vaccine.

More information on preventing influenza can be found at www.scdhec.gov/flu.


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