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A fire at a hospital ward at COVID-1

9 in the West Indies killed 18 patients early Saturday as the country, battling the worst outbreak to date, stepped up vaccination for all its adults. (May 1)

AP Internal

The administration of President Joe Biden plans to limit travel between the United States and India from Tuesday due to an increase in COVID-19 cases in the country of 1.4 billion people.

India set a new daily world record for new cases on Saturday, with more than 400,000 new cases and 3,500 deaths, according to official general experts suspected to be counting. Less than 2% of the country is fully vaccinated, with just under 150 million doses administered.

With a lack of oxygen in hospitals, patients suffocate and their families – overwhelmed with grief and helplessness – run frantically to obtain oxygen on their own. This week, the United States sent supplies to the country, including rapid tests, N95 masks and oxygen cylinders.

On Saturday, 12 people, including a doctor, died at a hospital in the Indian capital after the facility ran out of medical oxygen. And in the West Indies, 18 patients died and 31 others were rescued in a fire in the hospital ward of COVID-19.

Also in the news:

►In the countries that mark May 1 as International Labor Day, workers demanded Saturday for more labor protection and financial support in the midst of a pandemic that has affected jobs and economies.

►The World Health Organization has given the green light for the emergency use of Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine. Many countries without their own extended medical regulatory and evaluation services rely on the WHO list to decide whether to use vaccines.

►Disneyland opened on Friday morning for the first time in 412 days – the longest closure in the park’s 65-year history.

► Cruise Lines welcomes the words that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is committed to resuming navigation in the United States by mid-summer and to change some of the rules around the resumption of travel.

►Canada will receive doses of Pfizer vaccines from the United States next week. The country received Pfizer vaccines from its website in Belgium. Vaccinations have increased in Canada in recent months.

► It was the anxiety – and not the problem with the shots – that caused fainting, dizziness and other short-term reactions in dozens of people at coronavirus vaccine clinics in five countries, US health officials concluded.

📈 Today’s numbers: According to data from Johns Hopkins University, the United States has more than 32.3 million confirmed cases of coronavirus and 576,000 deaths. The total number is total: nearly 151.5 million cases and 3.18 million deaths. More than 308.7 million doses of vaccine have been distributed in the United States and 240.1 million have been administered, according to the CDC. More than 101.1 million Americans have been fully vaccinated.

📘 What we read: Native American tribes have long struggled with a high rate of diabetes. COVID-19 made the problem even more urgent.

Keep updating this page for the latest updates. I want more? Sign up for our coronavirus newsletter to update your mailbox and join our Facebook group.

The governor of Oregon imposes stricter restrictions on COVID-19

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown on Friday defended her decision to impose stricter restrictions on COVID-19 for nearly half of the state’s counties.

Fifteen counties entered the most extreme category of restrictions on Friday, meaning restaurants can no longer offer indoor dining, other businesses and religious organizations have lower capacity limits, and social gatherings are limited.

Brown said she had been provided with data showing that without restriction, about 450 additional people would be hospitalized and hundreds more would die in the next three weeks. “As your governor, I have chosen to save lives,” she told a news conference.

If vaccinations continue at the current rate, Oregon must make enough profits to remove the final restrictions in three weeks, Brown said.

“Tracy Lowe, Salem State Gazette.”

The Kentucky Derby returns on the regular day of the race, but with fewer fans present.

Fans will be attending the 147th Kentucky Derby this year, for the first time since 2019. But that doesn’t mean the scene will look like your typical first Saturday in May.

About 15,000 fans will be allowed inside, Churchill Downs announced in early April, while reserved seats will fill the stands to between 40% and 60% capacity, meaning about 45,000 people can be on the historic track for the annual Run for Roses.

According to state and local guidelines, masks should be worn at all times, except when actively eating or drinking. Hand washing areas and hand sanitizers will be easily accessible throughout the facility. Guests will be encouraged to distance themselves socially from others whenever possible, according to Churchill Downs.

– Lucas Olbach and Dahlia Gabor, Louisville Courier Journa

The WHO approves the Moderna vaccine for emergency use

The World Health Organization has given the green light for the emergency use of Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine.

The MRNA vaccine from the US manufacturer joined vaccines from AstraZeneca, Pfizer-BioNTech and Johnson & Johnson in obtaining the WHO emergency list. Similar approvals for Chinese vaccines Sinopharm and Sinovac are expected in the coming days and weeks, the WHO said.

The green light for the Moderna vaccine, announced late Friday, took many months due to delays faced by the WHO in receiving data from the manufacturer. Many countries without their own extended medical regulation and assessment services rely on the WHO list to decide whether to use vaccines. The UN Children’s Agency (UNICEF) also uses the list of emergency vaccines, such as pandemics.

However, the report is unlikely to have an immediate impact on Modern’s vaccine supply to the developing world. The company has entered into supply agreements with very rich countries that have already received millions of doses.

In a statement Friday, CEO Stefan Bansel said Moderna “is actively involved in discussions with multilateral organizations, such as COVAX, to help protect the world’s population.” He cites a UN-backed program to deliver COVID-19 vaccines to many low- and middle-income countries as needed.

– Associated Press

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With ambulances lined up as far as the eye can see as COVID-19 ravages India, some crematoria have focused on building funeral pyres outside.

Fabulous

The mandate of the federal mask has been extended until September for planes, trains, buses

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has eased mask guidelines for vaccinated Americans, and some countries have revoked mask mandates. But masks will still be a must if you travel by plane, train or bus this summer.

The Transport Security Administration on Friday extended its face mask requirement for planes, airports, trains, passenger rail systems and other modes of transport until September 13th. The term, which began on February 1st, was due to expire on May 11th.

“The requirement for a federal mask throughout the transportation system seeks to minimize the spread of COVID-19 in public transportation,” Darby LaJoy, a senior TSA official, said in a statement. “Currently, about half of all adults have at least one vaccination and masks remain an important tool to combat this pandemic. We will continue to work closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to assess the need for directives and recognize the significant level of compliance to date. ” Read more.

“Dawn Gilbertson.”

The United States will restrict flights from India due to the jump in COVID-19

President Joe Biden’s administration plans to limit travel between the United States and India from Tuesday due to an increase in COVID cases.

The move follows a recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said White House spokesman Jen Psaki. “The policy will be implemented in the light of the unusually large number of cases of COVID-19 and the many options circulating in India,” she said in a statement.

Details are not yet available on whether flights will be banned from India or foreign nationals will be banned. Read more here.

“Dawn Gilbertson and Joey Garrison.”

100 million Americans received two doses or one J&J shot

One hundred million Americans have received their second of two shots or a single vaccine, a “significant advance” in the fight against COVID-19, White House officials said Friday.

“These are 100 million Americans with a sense of relief and peace of mind knowing that after a long and difficult year, they are protected from the virus,” said Jeff Zients, the White House’s coronavirus response coordinator.

Zients said the next phase of the national vaccine program will focus on hard-to-reach Americans. Surgeon General Vivek Murty stressed the need to combat vaccine volatility and build trust in vaccines.

“This is one of those moments that is on hand on deck,” Murty said, adding that vaccinated people should encourage both family and friends to do so.

“Ryan W. Miller.”

Indian Americans feel helpless when a family in India falls ill

At 8,000 miles, New Jersey resident Radhika Iyengar worries about her 82-year-old mother in Bhopal, India. Her mother suffers from COVID-19, but cannot receive a hospital bed or oxygen tank as the pandemic reaches catastrophic levels. Iyengar remains in Milburn, New Jersey, discouraged, unable to travel to India with much of the country in captivity.

“It’s so amazing,” Iyengar said amid sobs in an interview this week. “In every house there are COVID, sick people. People die in cars, in their homes.”

As a second wave of coronavirus ravages India, Indian Americans are trying to reach out to relatives by organizing relief and quietly worrying about relatives in the world’s worst outbreak.

“India is experiencing the worst health crisis at the moment,” said Sapna Gupta of the Short Hills. “Almost everyone is affected by the virus. Many lose loved ones, and many fail to even say goodbye.” Read more here.

– Mary Bye, NorthJersey.com

Contribution: Associated Press

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