Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Entertainment https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ The Simpson prison writer reveals how the series bypassed online censorship with “Itching and Scratches”

The Simpson prison writer reveals how the series bypassed online censorship with “Itching and Scratches”



The famous solitary writer “The Simpsons” John Swartzvelder revealed how the show bypassed censorship in its early days in an extremely rare interview.

Despite his secretive nature, Swartzvelder is a very popular figure among die-hard Simpson fans, as he is credited with writing fifty-nine episodes of the comedy, more than any other writer in the show’s history.

After advertising before turning to the world of television on Saturday Night Live, Swartzvelder became one of the Simpsons’ most beloved writers and immediately strayed from the limelight.

However, he gave an interview with renowned comedian interviewing Mike Sachs for The New Yorker, in which he talked about his career and the puzzlingly unregulated early days of America̵

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“Thanks to the deal [executive producer] There was Jim Brooks, the Fox executives could not interfere in the Simpsons in any way, although we received censorship notes, Swartzvelder explained. – No preliminary copies of the scripts were sent to the supervisors and they could not attend the reading. although they wanted a lot. All we had to do was please ourselves. “

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The Simpsons writer John Swartzvelder revealed the early days of the hit animated comedy.

The Simpsons writer John Swartzvelder revealed the early days of the hit animated comedy.
(FOX)

He added: “It’s a very dangerous way to run a TV show, leaving the artists in charge of the art, but in the end it turned out well. At the age of thirty, money was pouring into Fox’s account. There’s a lesson out there.”

Despite the unprecedented freedom that artists like him had on the show, he and early writers were still proud to distort their only hurdle, network censorship. Swartzvelder explained that they managed to bring some of the most violent and bloody things on the air through Springfield’s own cartoon in the cartoon “Itching and Scratches.”

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The obvious example of this would be The Itch and Scratch Show [the violent cat-and-mouse children’s cartoon within ‘The Simpsons’]. We could show horrible things to the children at home, as long as we show them to be shown to Simpson’s children first, “he explained. Somehow, this extra step confused our critics and thwarted the crowds with torches. We agreed with them that it is wrong to show children. “Didn’t we just show it was wrong?” And look, there are more wrong things! “

The Simpsons writer John Swartzvelder gave a rare interview about his writing on the show.

The Simpsons writer John Swartzvelder gave a rare interview about his writing on the show.
(Fox)

Swartzvelder, whose episodes include favorite episodes such as “Itching and Scratching and Marge,” “Bart the Killer,” “Dog of Death,” “Homer at the Bat,” “The Clown Homi,” “Bart Gets an Elephant,” “The Enemy of Homer “And” Homer vs. the Eighteenth Amendment “left the show about eighteen years ago.

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Yet his presence is widely outlined in the show, as the revered mind behind Swartzweldian’s remarks as “To alcohol. The cause and solution of all life’s problems.” When asked to reflect on the impact his writing had on The Simpsons, he said he was pleased to see that writers were getting what they deserved.

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“I’m pleased with the attention,” he concluded. The Simpsons did something I didn’t think possible: it made viewers watch writers’ credits on television. When I grew up, we looked at the names of the actors and maybe the director, but that’s all.

Now a whole generation of viewers not only know about writers, they wonder what we really are in real life. And they want to know what we think. And look out our windows. It’s kind of like progress, and we have The Simpsons, for thank you for that. “


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