Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Health https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ The suicide rate of youth is increasing and this 23-year-old, who has tried to take her own life, has some thoughts about it

The suicide rate of youth is increasing and this 23-year-old, who has tried to take her own life, has some thoughts about it



On the eve of New Year's Eve in 2017, Kitelin Buchko felt like everyone in the world was celebrating except her. Most other 21-year-olds celebrated their first New Year's Eve by legally ordering drinks at a bar, but not Buchko's. She was home with her parents ̵

1; and had no plans to do so until 2018.

A South Carolina native struggled with anxiety, bipolar disorder and narcolepsy. She tried medication after taking medication, but was still struggling. She had just come out of an abuse and was not managing the parting well. She felt new layers continue to add to her pain. And as people around the world popped champagne and tossed candy, Buchko tried to put an end to his own life.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "The history of Buchko is not uncommon. earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (19459006) (CDC) released a report showing suicide rates among people aged 10 to 24 increased 56% between 2007 and 2017 after remaining relatively stable from 2000 to 2007. In 2017, suicide was the second leading cause of death among this age group following accidental injuries such as car accidents or drug overdoses. "data-reactid = "20"> The story of Buccio is not uncommon. Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report showing that suicide rates among people aged 10 to 24 rose 56% between 2007 and 2017, after remaining relatively stable from 2000 to 2007 In 2017, suicide is the second leading cause of death among this age group, in the case of accidental injuries such as car accidents or drug overdoses.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Researchers are not sure about the exact reasons that "The suicide rate is very wide," Sally Curtain, a CDC statistician and author of the report, tells Health . "It's in all racial groups and in almost every state. We cannot isolate it into one group or zone – it is widespread in the United States. "" Data-reactid = "21"> Researchers are not sure about the exact reasons for feeding this alarming statistic. "The incidence of suicide is very wide," says Sally Curtain, a CDC statistician and author of the report, on Health . "It's in every race group and every state. We cannot isolate this into one group or area – it is widespread in the United States. "

Experts believe that adolescent depression, drug use, stress, use of social media, suicide visibility in the media and online, and access to firearms, may be important factors, although additional measures need to be taken. research to know for sure. In the meantime, Curtain says it is important to talk to young people about their stressors and experts working to prevent suicide in order to better understand the crisis.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = " RELATED: What to say – and what not to say – when talking about suicide "data-reactid =" 23 "> RELATED: What to say – and what not to say – when you talk about suicide

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "One of the reasons why it is difficult to determine the exact reasons, says the Curtain is that in most cases there is not only one thing that makes a person suicide.This applies to Buchko.This was not just because of the stress of learning rather, she was feeling that she was "still getting hammered with another thing to do," she says Health . "data-reactid =" 24 "> One of the reasons it is difficult to determine the exact reasons, says the Curtain, is that in most cases there is not one thing that makes a person suicidal. That was true of Buchko. It wasn't just because of stress at school or the pressure of social media. Rather, she felt like she was "still struggling with something else to do," she says Health .

It all started during her junior year in high school. Lump regularly had stomach pains, but they grew much worse. When they were really bad, she couldn't eat or even walk. She went to a specialist and was diagnosed with gastroparesis or abdominal palsy. The doctor said it was caused by anxiety.

"At first I thought, 'But I'm not worried? "Says Buchko. She had noticed that her stomach aches were worse when she was in a strict teacher class or studying a subject she didn't believe was good but didn't think much. "I just assumed it happened to everyone," she says. Her doctor explained that stomach pains can be a symptom of anxiety and that sometimes anxiety is a physical pain. "The more I thought about it, I thought, 'Well, maybe not everyone scares the way I do it every day when I go to school,'" she recalls.

She did what she could to manage her stress, but things only got worse. One night, early in her senior year, she quarreled with her mother about her room not being as clean as she (and most other teens) had done so many times before. But this time, something was different. The battle sent Buchko in a rage and she tried to escape.

She got in her car and started driving. She was screaming, crying, hitting the steering wheel. "I killed myself for the first time," she says.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = " RELATED: 8 signs someone is at risk of suicide "data-reactid =" 29 "> RELATED: 8 characters someone is at risk of suicide [19659005]

Eventually Buchko returned home and her family took care to get help. She went to her GP, who referred her to a psychiatrist. She was then diagnosed with rapid cyclic bipolar disorder, a type of bipolar disorder characterized by having four or more episodes of depression and / or mania per year.

Following his diagnosis, Buchko graduated from the last few months of his senior year. It wasn't easy since stress was the trigger for her bipolar disorder, but she did. He decided to take one leave before starting college to prioritize his mental health. Then, in the fall of 2015, she enrolled as a nurse student at Anderson University in South Carolina.

Buchko was excited to go to college to get back to "normal". But it wasn't long before freshman year stress began to approach her. "Stress is the biggest trigger for my bipolar," she says. "When I'm stressed, it breaks out and I get manic or depressed." On top of that, Buchko also dealt with narcolepsy or hyper daytime sleepiness, which she would not be officially diagnosed with until a few months later.

In early 2016, when his second semester began, Buccio's psychiatrist offered to retire from medicine. "I'm really upset about that," she says. "It was really hard for me to feel like I had fallen into something."

Buchko felt that her mental illness was derailing her life and spending time after leaving college, trying to get well. She was admitted to a psychiatric hospital for a week, went to therapy, tried various medications and went horseback riding. She was learning how to control her emotions. But at the end of 2017, everything started to unravel.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = " RELATED: 6 ways to help a person who lost a loved one to suicide "data-reactid =" 37 "> RELATED: 6 ways to help a person who lost a loved one to suicide

relations and immediately after Christmas, she and her partner broke up, which, in her opinion, sent her "spiral". A few days later it was New Year's Day, when

Fortunately, Buchko's mother found her before it was too late. She survived and when she woke up the next day, she was immediately grateful that she had a second chance.

Buchko was almost part of the statistics in the CDC's new report on the rising rate of suicide among young people. When he heard the numbers in that report, he was not surprised. "There is a lot of pressure these days on young people and young people," she says. "People say, 'Oh, young, you can't be so stressed,' but that's not true."

She says that the pressure to do well in school and go to a good college only increases for the young people, and Jennifer Rothman, manager of youth and young adult initiatives at the National Alliance on Mental Illness, agrees.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8 em) – sm" type = "text" content = "" Many students want a lot, "he says Rothman Health . "They try to juggle by taking extracurricular courses, doing their homework, and maintaining their grades. They do not have the skills to deal with such stress. I know a lot of adults who don't have the skills to deal with stress like that. "" data-reactid = "42"> "Many students want a lot," says Rothman Health . "They try to juggle by taking extracurricular courses, doing their homework and maintaining their grades. They have no skills to deal with this stress. I know many adults who don't have the skills to deal with stress this way. ”

<p class =" canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) –sm "type =" text "content =" RELATED: Why do people kill themselves? These 5 factors help to explain it "data-reactid =" 43 "> RELATED: Why Are People Killed? These 5 factors help to explain

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Interesting, in a 2018 study by American College of Health Association (ACHA), college students report that anxiety and depression are among the biggest factors negatively affecting their academic performance. data-reactid = " Interestingly, in a 2018 study by the American College of Health Association (ACHA), college students report that anxiety and depression are among the biggest negatively affecting factors

Rothman adds that amongst all the students participate in, they don't have much time to stay and whatever time they can get to themselves, they spend online. "They're on their phones, iPads, computers," he adds. Buchko also believes that time spent online is an important factor. "Social media can be a very negative place, especially if you are struggling," she says. Various studies have linked social media to depression in young people, which is also growing.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) –sm" type = "text" content = "The 2018 ACHA study identified that 42% of students felt so depressed in the last year that it was difficult for them to function.However, the same survey given in 2009 found 31% of students thought that this level of depression However, more students use their campus counseling centers, which experts attribute to reducing the stigma of mental illness. "Data-reactid =" 46 "> The 2018 ACHA study found that 42 % of cold the entities have been feeling so depressed over the last year that it has been difficult for them to function. Yet, the same study, conducted in 2009, found that 31% of students experienced this level of depression. However, more students are using their campus counseling centers, which experts attribute to reducing the stigma of mental illness.

Buchko agrees that mental illness is becoming more accepted, but she says there are many more times and young people need to be reminded that there is nothing wrong with asking for help. "We are getting into a way of thinking that no one understands," Buchko says. "We feel so alone, but if we just talk about it, we would realize that we really aren't."

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