Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Science https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ The terrifying sea lizard that roamed the waters 66 million years ago had deadly shark-like teeth.

The terrifying sea lizard that roamed the waters 66 million years ago had deadly shark-like teeth.



The terrifying sea lizard that roamed the coasts of Africa 66 million years ago had deadly shark-like teeth that could cut a fish in half in one bite.

  • Scientists have discovered the fossils of a new species of mosaic
  • The mossauars were giant sea lizards that lived with the dinosaurs
  • This species has been found to have shark-like teeth that have given it a deadly bite
  • The discovery suggests that the diversity of mosasaurs peaked just before the dinosaur-killing asteroid struck 66 million years ago.

A prehistoric reptile that roamed the coasts of Africa 66 million years ago had deadly shark-like teeth that could cut a fish in half with one bite, a study reveals.

Researchers have discovered the fossilized remains of a new species of mosaic – an ancient sea lizard from the dinosaur era.

This particular species has been found to have shark-like teeth that have given it a deadly bite.

The discovery contributes to the diversity of marine reptiles at the end of the Cretaceous and suggests that their diversity peaked just before the dinosaur-killing asteroid struck 66 million years ago, according to researchers.

Researchers have discovered the fossils of a new species of mosaic - an ancient sea lizard from the age of the dinosaurs

Researchers have discovered the fossils of a new species of mosaic – an ancient sea lizard from the age of the dinosaurs

WHAT WAS XENODENS KALMINECHARI?

Xenodens calminechari is a species of mosaic that lived off the coast of Morocco 66 million years ago.

This particular species has been found to have shark-like teeth that have given it a deadly bite.

While the sea lizard is only the same size as a small guinea pig, its cutting teeth would allow it to attack large fish by cutting them in half and taking large bites.

Fossils of the new species, called Xenodens calminechari, were discovered in Maastricht phosphates in Morocco by researchers at the University of Bath.

Dr Nick Longrich, a senior lecturer at the Milner Center for Evolution at the University of Bath and lead author of the study, said: “66 million years ago, the coast of Africa was the most dangerous sea in the world.

“The diversity of predators there was unlike anything seen anywhere else on the planet.

“The new mosaic adds to the rapidly growing list of marine reptiles known from Morocco’s newest Cretaceous, which at the time was submerged under a tropical sea.

“A huge variety of mosasaurs lived here. Some were giant, deep-diving predators like modern sperm whales, others with huge teeth up to ten feet long, were the best predators like killer whales, still others ate shellfish like modern sea otters – and then there were the strange little Xenodens.

“They coexisted with long-throated plesiosaurs, giant sea turtles and saber-toothed fish.

While the sea lizard is only the same size as a small guinea pig, its cutting teeth would allow it to attack large fish by cutting them in half and taking large bites.

While the sea lizard is only the same size as a small guinea pig, its cutting teeth would allow it to attack large fish by cutting them in half and taking large bites.

“The new mosasaur adds another dangerous predator to the mix.”

While the sea lizard was only the same size as a small guinea pig, its cutting teeth would allow it to strike its weight, cutting the fish in half and taking large bites from larger animals.

“They’re like knives sold in those old late-night TV commercials – they’ll cut everything,” Dr. Longrich said.

Mosazaurs lived with dinosaurs before the asteroid hit and destroyed 90 percent of all species on Earth.

Reconstruction of his skull reveals that his teeth were tightly packed, creating a toothed effect

Reconstruction of his skull reveals that his teeth were tightly packed, creating a toothed effect

However, the new study shows that the ecosystem was not in decline before the asteroid’s impact, and instead it is likely that marine reptiles will actually grow in diversity.

Dr Nur-Edin Jalil of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris and the Kadi Iyad University in Marrakech said:

“Xenodens calminechari is further evidence of the unusual paleobiodiversity of the phosphate sea.

“It’s as if nature is trying to find all the combinations for ever more subtle exploitation of food sources.”

HOW DINOSAURS PASSED ABOUT 66 MILLION YEARS

Dinosaurs ruled and dominated Earth about 66 million years ago, before suddenly disappearing.

The credo-tertiary extinction is the name given to this mass extinction.

For many years, a changing climate was thought to destroy the food chain of giant reptiles.

In the 1980s, paleontologists discovered a layer of iridium.

This is an element that is rare on Earth, but is found in huge quantities in space.

When this is dated, it coincides exactly with the time when the dinosaurs disappeared from the fossil record.

A decade later, scientists discovered the massive Chicxulub crater on top of the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, which dates from that period.

Now the scientific consensus says that these two factors are related and both are probably caused by a huge asteroid crashing into Earth.

With the predicted size and speed of the impact, the collision would cause a huge shock wave and is likely to cause seismic activity.

The debris would create ash spots that probably covered the entire planet and made it impossible for dinosaurs to survive.

Other animals and plant species had a shorter period between generations, which allowed them to survive.

There are several other theories about what caused the death of famous animals.

One early theory was that small mammals ate dinosaur eggs, and another suggested that toxic angiosperms (flowering plants) killed them.

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