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These 6 jobs are related to poor heart health in women



What Do Social Workers, Nurses, Health Care Assistants, and Retailers Have in Common? According to a new study, they are likely to have worse heart health than women working in other jobs.

In a study involving more than 65,000 menopausal women, researchers found that women working in the above jobs were more likely to have poor heart health. [19659003] Do I hate vegetables? Genetics Can Benefit, Suggestion Research

In particular, researchers – adjusted for age, race, marital status and education – found that female social workers were 36 percent more likely to have heart problems while having heart problems retail boxes are 33 percent more likely. Meanwhile, women's mental health providers, home health aides and women's nurses are 1

6 percent more likely to suffer from poor heart health. Female Registered Nurses (RNs) also had a 14 percent higher risk of the same, according to a report by the American Heart Association.

Comparatively, female real estate brokers and sales agents are 24 percent less likely to suffer from poor cardiac health, while female administrative assistants are 11 percent less likely.

  New research shows that social workers, nurses, health care assistants, and retailers are more likely to have poor heart health than women working in other workplaces.

A new study shows that social workers, nurses, health care assistants, and retailers are more likely to have poor heart health than women working in other workplaces.
(iStock)

The results will be presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions event this coming weekend.

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"Some of the professions that have had [a] high risk of ill health at home. This is surprising because these women are probably more aware of the risk factors for cardiovascular health, "says study author Bede Nriagu, MBBS, MPH, Research Fellow in Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Dornsif School of Public Health at Drexel University .

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"We interpret this to mean that it is important to go beyond individual factors, such as health knowledge, to better understand the context of healthcare and other work places that adversely affect women's cardiovascular health, "he continued, noting that clinicians should ask about their patient's profession to help determine if they are at increased risk of cardiovascular problems system.


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