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Trump loses tax return appeal: NPR



President Trump congratulates Bikers members on Trump and his supporters in August 2018 at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, NJ. .

Carolyn Custer / AP


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Caroline Custer / AP

President Trump congratulates Bikers members on Trump and his supporters in August 2018 at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, NJ. The House Ways and Means Committee calls, among other tax records, those related to his club Bedminster.

Carolyn Custer / AP

The US Court of Appeals opened the door to Congress to gain access to eight years of President Trump's tax records, setting the scene for probable review by the US Supreme Court.

The Full Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit declined to re-visit a tribunal panel that allowed Congress to call on the president's tax records. The Chamber's Committee on Oversight and Reform called for these records in March.

The divided three-member committee decided in October that the House had a legitimate legislative pursuit to seek Trump's personal tax returns. The president's attorneys had asked for the full D.C. Circuit to review the case.

But Congress probably won't see those documents any time soon. The D.C Circuit had already said it would give the president seven days to file a complaint. Trump's outside counsel, Jay Sekulov, told NPR that he and his client "will want a Supreme Court review."

The president and his attorneys also hope the Supreme Court blocks another, separate offer to receive tax bills. his declarations.

A large New York court hearing seeks these documents as part of an investigation into allegations that the president paid money to two women through his former attorney, Michael D. Cohen, before the 2016 election. [19659008] DC Circuit voted 8-3 in favor of the earlier decision. Seven of the eight justices were appointed by Presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, both Democrats. The eighth was named by President George W. Bush, a Republican.

The three dissenting judges – those on the president's side – are all Republican nominees. Two were appointed by Trump and the third by President George H.W. Bush.


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