Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Health https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ UC doctor Davis is working to remove skepticism about the COVID-19 vaccine

UC doctor Davis is working to remove skepticism about the COVID-19 vaccine



California Governor Gavin Newsum called on “trusted envoys” to help build trust and confidence in COVID-19 vaccines. One of the people who responded to the request for help was Dr. David Tom Cook, head of general thoracic surgery at UC Davis Health Cook, an African-American doctor, said his community was severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and urged everyone to are vaccinated. He spoke to Brittany Johnson of KCRA 3, urging others to get the vaccine. Question: Why did you take part in the Pfizer vaccination test against COVID-19? Cook: I felt the need to pay, I said I would stand up for the community I was part of, for the black community, for participation in clinical trials, in particular for the COVID-1

9 clinical trial, and one day I would get the vaccine that I I have to set an example myself and voluntarily participate in the clinical trial. Q: How did you feel after receiving the vaccine? Have you had any side effects? Cook: I myself had very few symptoms. I had some muscle aches at the injection site and some fatigue. It may be hard to say because I’m always tired based on my work, but there are no real significant symptoms. I operate for my livelihood. I’m having surgery and I haven’t missed a job at all. Question: Although both Pfizer and Moderna report about 95% efficacy of their vaccines, some communities remain skeptical about the schedule in which vaccines are developed. Is this a legitimate concern? Dr. Cook: It’s different from buying a new iPhone. The new iPhone has not passed rigorous clinical trials and tests. It may have had a prototype and then be released to the public. This vaccine is different. If you are eligible for this vaccine, you are not the first to receive it. In fact, there are 43,000 people who are in the Pfizer clinical trial alone and 22,000 of whom have received the actual vaccine. If we looked at the Pfizer trial, about 10% of the participants in that trial were African American, while 25% were Hispanic, so these are a large number of representative individuals from communities that resemble our own. should people do if they have questions about the vaccine? Cook: Talk to people you trust – your doctor, your doctor, and have a conversation. Maybe instead of surfing online, you can actually talk to your doctor and ask your doctor or assistant who deals with your nurse what you think about the vaccine and what you need to do to get it. vaccine skepticism.

California Gov. Gavin Newsum is calling on “trusted envoys” to help build trust and confidence in COVID-19 vaccines.

One of the people who responded to the request for help was Dr. David Tom Cook, head of general thoracic surgery at UC Davis Health.

Cook, an African-American, said his community had been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic and called for everyone to be vaccinated. He spoke to Brittany Johnson of KCRA 3, urging others to get the vaccine.

IN: Why did you take the Pfizer vaccination test against COVID-19?

Dr. Cook: I felt the need to pay, I said I would stand up for the community of which I am a part, for the black community to participate in clinical trials, in particular the COVID-19 clinical trial, and one day to receive the vaccine that I myself must to set an example and to participate voluntarily in the clinical trial.

IN: How did you feel after receiving the vaccine? Have you had any side effects?

Dr. Cook: I myself had very few symptoms. I had some muscle aches at the injection site and some fatigue. It may be hard to say because I’m always tired based on my work, but there are no real significant symptoms. I operate for my livelihood. I’m having a maintenance operation and I haven’t missed a job at all.

Question: Although both Pfizer and Moderna report about 95% efficacy with their vaccines, some communities remain skeptical about the timing of the vaccines. Is this a legitimate concern?

Dr. Cook: This is different from buying a new iPhone. The new iPhone has not passed rigorous clinical trials and tests. It may have had a prototype and then be released to the public. This vaccine is different. If you are eligible for this vaccine, you are not the first to receive it. In fact, there are 43,000 people who are in the Pfizer clinical trial alone and 22,000 of whom have received the actual vaccine. If we looked at the Pfizer trial, about 10% of the participants in this trial were African American, while 25% were Hispanic, so these are a large number of representative individuals from communities that resemble ours.

IN: What should people do if they have questions about the vaccine?

Dr. Cook: Talk to people you trust – your doctor, your doctor and have a conversation. Maybe instead of surfing online, you can actually talk to your doctor and ask your doctor or assistant who practices your nurse their thoughts on the vaccine and what you need to do to get it.

Join KCRA 3 at 7pm on Tuesday for a special report on vaccine skepticism.


Source link