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Washable photos of the surface of Mars taken by Curiosity – as NASA celebrates the 8th anniversary of Rover on Red Planet



NASA’s Curiosity Mars is celebrating its eighth anniversary on the Red Planet this week.

The $ 2.5 billion (£ 1.9 billion) machine took several stunning photos during its stay in the dusty world, including the first-ever selfie on Mars.

This amazing selfie was taken from a Nasa Curiosity rover in the Namib Dune in 2016. The camera used for this was the Mars manual reversing device sitting at the end of the rover's robotic arm.

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This amazing selfie was taken from a Nasa Curiosity rover in the Namib Dune in 2016. The camera used for this was the Mars manual reversing device sitting at the end of the rover’s robotic arm.Credit: Nasa

The mission of curiosity is to find out if the planet has ever been or is suitable for microbial life.

Regarding the size of the MINI Cooper, the rover is loaded with 17 cameras and a robotic arm containing a set of specialized scientific tools.

During his eight years (and counting) on ​​Mars, Curiosity photographed hills and craters that once flowed with Martian rivers and lakes.

He also captured the highest-resolution panorama to date on the surface of Martian, giving space fans their fullest view on the planet.

After Wednesday’s anniversary, here are some of the best images the rover has sent back to Earth.

Sunset on Mars

The sun as it sets over the surface of Martian in April 2015.

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The sun as it sets over the surface of Martian in April 2015.Credit: Nasa

King of the hill

This Mastcam view of the Curiosity Mars rover shows a 16-foot-tall dark mound called Ireson Hill on the lower Sharp Mountains.

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This Mastcam view of the Curiosity Mars rover shows a 16-foot-tall dark mound called Ireson Hill on the lower Sharp Mountains.Credit: Nasa

Ridge-striker

Curiosity while exploring the Martian Ridge on June 18, 2019, the 2440th Martian day or mission salt

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Curiosity while exploring the Martian Ridge on June 18, 2019, the 2440th Martian day or mission saltCredit: Nasa

Holly begs

Two-inch hole drilled using new NASA Curiosity rover drilling technique

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Two-inch hole drilled using NASA’s new Curiosity rover drilling techniqueCredit: Nasa

Rock’n’roll

Rocky east on the surface of Martian, clicked by the rover of Nasa Curiosity

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Rocky east on the surface of Martian, clicked by the rover of Nasa CuriosityCredit: Nasa

I see you

Curiosity snapped this picture of Earth and Venus as seen from the surface of Mars earlier this year

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Curiosity snapped this picture of Earth and Venus as seen from the surface of Mars earlier this yearCredit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / MSSS / SSI

Waterway

The Kimberley formation, clicked by the rover of Nasa Curiosity.  The way the land descends to Mount Sharpe suggests that the water flowed to a pool that once existed.

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The Kimberley formation, clicked by the rover of Nasa Curiosity. The way the land descends to Mount Sharpe suggests that the water flowed to a pool that once existed.Credit: Nasa

Dune buggy

This view from Mast Camera on the Curiosity rover shows ripples in a dune field on the lower Sharp Peak, taken in March 2017 as part of a 360-degree panorama taken from Ogunkit Beach

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This view from Mast Camera on the Curiosity rover shows ripples in a dune field on the lower Sharp Peak, taken in March 2017 as part of a 360-degree panorama taken from Ogunkit BeachCredit: Nasa

Panorama drama

The panorama of Mars with the highest resolution was taken by Curiosity at the end of 2019

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The panorama of Mars with the highest resolution was taken by Curiosity at the end of 2019Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / MSSS

Martian mountains

This image of Curiosity shows sloping hams and rocky, multi-layered protrusions of Mount Sharpe.  The bogs are eroded remains of ancient sandstone

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This image of Curiosity shows sloping hams and rocky, multi-layered protrusions of Mount Sharpe. The bogs are eroded remains of ancient sandstoneCredit: Nasa

Wheely good

The Curiosity rover took this photo in 2012, showing its three left wheels.  In the distance you can see the lower slope of Mount Sharpe

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The Curiosity rover took this photo in 2012, showing its three left wheels. In the distance you can see the lower slope of Mount SharpeCredit: Nasa

Iron throne

This photo shows a meteorite clicked by Curiosity.  The rock, called Lebanon, is an iron meteorite that landed on Mars from somewhere else in space.

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This photo shows a meteorite clicked by Curiosity. The rock, called Lebanon, is an iron meteorite that landed on Mars from somewhere else in space.Credit: Nasa

Facts on Mars

Here’s what you need to know about the Red Planet …

  • Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun.
  • He was named after the Roman god of war
  • The land mass of Mars is very similar to Earth, but due to the difference in gravity you can jump three times higher there than you can here
  • Mars is mountainous and hosts the highest mountain known in the solar system called Olympus Mons, which is three times higher than Everest.
  • Mars is considered the second most inhabitable planet after Earth
  • It takes 687 Earth days on the planet to orbit the Sun.
  • So far, there are 39 missions on Mars, but only 16 of them have been successful
The panorama of Eerie Nasa from the surface of Mars is the most detailed so far

In other news, NASA launched its last seven-month rover to the Red Planet last week.

SpaceX billionaire boss Elon Musk announced last month that his company’s mission to get a man to Mars is now his “top priority.”

And NASA has unveiled the design of a lunar lander that could take astronauts back to the lunar surface by 2024.

Which photo out of curiosity is your favorite? Let us know in the comments!


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