Home https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ Health https://server7.kproxy.com/servlet/redirect.srv/sruj/smyrwpoii/p2/ “We just don’t have supplies”

“We just don’t have supplies”



In his first full-time job, President Biden signed several executive actions and developed a comprehensive strategy to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic. The new 200-page plan includes efforts to increase testing and increase production of PPE and vaccines through the Defense Manufacturing Act. This move could not have come earlier for California, where a number of counties reported high levels of demand for the vaccine and a shortage of supply. KCRA 3 sat down with Yolo County Public Health Officer Dr. Amy Sison for additional context. KCRA 3: Have you heard anything from the state about this new plan from the Biden administration? Sison: The California Department of Public Health has not sent all communications regarding Biden̵

7;s plan. I am excited about the plan and the seriousness with which the Biden administration accepts the spread of the vaccine. KCRA 3: What sets you apart most from this new plan? Sison: I’m glad to see the emphasis on increasing vaccine production through the Defense Manufacturing Act … and I’m also providing additional vacancies for vaccine administration. All of them will be very useful for us in Yolo County ahead, especially anything that will increase the supply of vaccines, because at the moment this is a very restrictive step. KCRA 3: Are there enough vaccines in your county right now? Sison: Absolutely not. We get about 1,000 vaccines a week. We have received about 7,000 doses in the last 7 weeks. We are in phase 1A, which means health workers and those in long-term care facilities, which has about 7,500 people. We estimate that we have several thousand more people to reach in this phase before we can move to 1B or those aged 65 and over. It has over 28,000 inhabitants aged 65 and over. At a rate of 1,000 doses a week, it will take us half a year to go only 65 and up if the spread of vaccines does not increase. KCRA 3: In general, you really don’t get enough vaccine from the state. Sison: We don’t get enough. We have the capacity to administer many more vaccines than we currently have. KCRA 3: Is the problem at the state level, or elsewhere? Sison: I don’t think the detention is at the state level. The state distributes all the vaccine it receives. The problem is that there are currently only two vaccines approved by the FDA, and everyone wants one, and there just isn’t enough vaccine produced. We need to increase production from Pfizer and Moderna. Part of the implementation of the Defense Manufacturing Act is specifically to increase the production of lipid particles into which mRNA passes for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. KCRA 3: Why do some states seem to be much luckier in managing vaccine supplies? Sison: All supplies of vaccines are purchased by the federal government and must be distributed proportionally to each state based on their population. Previously, the distribution was based on the number of health workers in each country. We are now changing so that the distribution is for the number of people aged 65 and over in each country. It is difficult to explain why one country is so ahead of the others. But at least in California, I think most health departments are in the same situation as Yolo County. We give as fast as we receive and what limits our administration is the supply of vaccine. Not that we don’t have enough people to apply it or structures on site, we just don’t have the vaccine. KCRA 3: What is the current demand for vaccines in Yolo County? Sison: The phones are ringing. We have over 16,000 people who have filled out an interest card to receive notifications to find out when it is time to be vaccinated. There is a great demand for the vaccine at the moment, which is wonderful. I want everyone who wants a vaccine to be able to get it, but at the moment we simply do not have a supply that meets the demand. I have to ask people to be patient. There is still a vaccine to come, we will have a vaccine for them, but they may have to wait a little longer. A spokesman for El Dorado County Public Health confirmed that he was also experiencing high levels of demand that exceeded current vaccine supplies. The county has not yet received any guidance from the state on potential changes in supply or distribution.

In his first full-time job, President Biden signed several executive actions and developed a comprehensive strategy to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic. The new 200-page plan includes efforts to increase testing and increase production of PPE and vaccines through the Defense Manufacturing Act.

This move could not have come earlier for California, where a number of counties reported high levels of demand for the vaccine and a shortage of supply.

KCRA 3 sat down with Yolo County Public Health Officer Dr. Amy Sison for additional context.

KCRA 3: Have you heard anything from the state about this new plan from the Biden administration?

Sison: The California Department of Public Health has not sent any communications regarding Biden’s plan. I am excited about the plan and the seriousness with which the Biden administration accepts the spread of the vaccine.

KCRA 3: What sets you apart most from this new plan?

Sison: I am glad to see the emphasis on increasing vaccine production through the Defense Manufacturing Act … and I am also providing additional places to administer the vaccine. All of them will be very useful for us in Yolo County ahead, especially anything that will increase the supply of vaccines, because at the moment this is a very restrictive step.

KCRA 3: Are there enough vaccines in your county right now?

Sison: Absolutely not. We get about 1,000 vaccines a week. We have received about 7,000 doses in the last 7 weeks. We are in phase 1A, which means health workers and those in long-term care facilities, which has about 7,500 people. We estimate that we have several thousand more people to reach in this phase before we can move to 1B or those aged 65 and over.

It has over 28,000 inhabitants aged 65 and over. At a rate of 1,000 doses a week, it will take us half a year to go only 65 and up if the spread of vaccines does not increase.

KCRA 3: Generally, you really don’t get enough vaccine from the state.

Sison: We don’t get enough. We have the capacity to administer many more vaccines than we currently have.

KCRA 3: Is the problem at the state level, or elsewhere?

Sison: I don’t think the detention is at the state level. The state distributes all the vaccine it receives. The problem is that there are currently only two vaccines approved by the FDA, and everyone wants one, and not enough vaccine is produced.

We need to have increased production from Pfizer and Moderna. Part of the implementation of the Defense Manufacturing Act is specifically to increase the production of lipid particles into which mRNA passes for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines.

KCRA 3: Why do some countries seem to be much luckier in managing vaccine supplies?

Sison: All supplies of vaccines are purchased by the federal government and must be distributed proportionally to each state based on their population. Previously, the distribution was based on the number of health workers in each country. We are now changing so that the distribution is for the number of people aged 65 and over in each country. It is difficult to explain why one country is so ahead of the others.

But at least in California, I think most health departments are in the same situation as Yolo County. We give [vaccines] as fast as we receive them and what limits our administration is the supply of vaccine. Not that we don’t have enough people to apply it or structures on site, we just don’t have the vaccine.

KCRA 3: What is the current demand in Yolo County for vaccines?

Sison: The phones ring from the hook. We have over 16,000 people who have filled out an interest card to receive notifications to find out when it is time to be vaccinated. There is a great demand for the vaccine at the moment, which is wonderful.

I want everyone who wants a vaccine to be able to get it, but at the moment we simply do not have a supply that meets the demand. I have to ask people to be patient. There is still a vaccine to come, we will have a vaccine for them, but they may have to wait a little longer.


A spokesman for El Dorado County Public Health confirmed that he was also experiencing high levels of demand that exceeded current vaccine supplies. The county has not yet received any guidance from the state on potential changes in supply or distribution.


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